I have a killer cat, a too effective predator

Discussion in 'Science & Society' started by Syzygys, May 6, 2013.

  1. Upstate8987 Registered Member

    Messages:
    16
    lol killer cat on the loose!
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    Get one of these:

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    The Hannibal Lecter Chipmunk Protector, only $7.50
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,671
    I don't think that protector would work. My grandpa had a cat, who was accidentally ran over by my uncle's car, so she got blind. She was still able to hunt birds while blind...
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    You could sew a row of Bells to the top of it.
     
  8. joepistole Deacon Blues Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,875
    How about an Invisible Fence to limit his hunting range?
     
  9. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    No use. They come to him.
    Some kind of Chipmunk Lemming syndrome.
     
  10. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,671
    I never heard of it for cats. I am not even sure it would work, maybe the cats just would freak out and jump over it.
     
  11. joepistole Deacon Blues Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,875
    Nor I, but if it can work on small dogs, it might work on small cats. You might want to discuss this and perhaps some other options with your vet. I have never had an Invisible Fence, so I am not all that familiar with them. But if they give the animal a buzz before it crosses the boundary line, that might be enough to keep it inside. Dogs, especially big dogs, get real excited and sometimes run through the Invisible Fence. But I think cats are more sensible and deliberate animals. So it might work better for them.
     
  12. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,671
    I have just found a dead chipmunk on the porch, probably has been dead for a week or so. Thus Bryce's killratio has improved:

    Bryce vs. chipmunks: 2:2
     
  13. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

    Messages:
    24,690
    The invisible fence is not a line, it's a field. A dog would have to put up with a rather long period of zapping, during which it would become stronger until he made it to the halfway point.

    Only dogs that have been bred to ignore pain like the pitbull and the Presa Canario would be willing to do that. And anybody dumb enough to "secure" one of those dogs with nothing more than an electric fence should probably be thrown to the wolves himself.

    Electric fences are not very popular with humans! They see a large snarling dog running straight at them, and they don't understand that there's an electric field there, which the company who manufactures it promises will stop the dog in time.
     
  14. joepistole Deacon Blues Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,875
    It sounds like there is the making of a Stephen King style novel here. Perhaps you can use the experience to write a horror novel and make a few bucks with the experience.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2013
  15. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,671
    We have came to the conclusion, that the damn cat learnt how to open the door. Sometimes for the night I close the door of his room where he has food and a litter box, so he wouldn't roam around the house ringing his bell during the night. Several times by the morning the door was open, just like this morning, and the cat is who knows were. Now I have seen him messing with the doorknob, but I always assumed since it is a knob not a lever, that he is just trying. But all evidence shows that yes, he is able to turn the knob and open the door.

    Damn cat.... This is his "you asshole, you really thought a closed door is going to stop me?" look:

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  16. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    Picture of cat in collar, Please.
     
  17. milkweed Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,654
    It would work but they are expensive. And you have to take the time to teach them the boundries.

    Have you tried a second bell on opposite side of collar yet?
     
  18. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,671
    Was provided earlier in the thread. This last picture was taken earlier...

    No I haven't tried 2 bells on opposing sides.
     
  19. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
  20. joepistole Deacon Blues Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,875
    So Labs are dogs bred to ignore pain? I have friends with a Labrador Retriever who tried the Invisible Fence and it didn't work for them. They eventually scrapped the Invisible Fence in favor of a traditional fence as the Lab kept escaping. Last time I checked Labs were family dogs and have not been bred to ignore pain. But they are a very excitable dog. And yes anyone who would use an Invisible Fence to secure dangerous dogs needs to have his head examined or be behind bars. But we are not talking about dogs here. We are talking about a potential new use for the fence - using it to secure a cat. And last time I checked the cat in question here was not hunting humans.
     
  21. joepistole Deacon Blues Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,875
  22. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    Protecting pets. Preserving peace of mind.
    How? To put it simply, a wire is discreetly installed around your property to create an Invisible Boundary®. Our professional pet trainers effectively teach your pet these fence boundaries and avoidance behaviors so your pet clearly knows where they can and cannot go. Your pet’s custom programmed Computer Collar® delivers a warning tone and if needed a non-harming but effective static correction should they forget or try to test their limits. View an interactive graphic to learn more.


    "Static Correction".
    Thank goodness for that.
    I thought it might involve electric shocks.
     
  23. Chipz Banned Banned

    Messages:
    838
    If it was me. I woould kill the cat and pyut him down
     

Share This Page