How do you measure wealth?

Discussion in 'General Philosophy' started by Bowser, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    "Can't buy me love."

    I believe that if I had millions of dollars, I would still live in a shack, find pleasure in the most mundane activities, and maintain the same relationships. Maybe the one thing I would change is my reliance on employment--I would retire. And I would probably travel more often.

    I know someone who has been financially successful. They are driven towards acquiring financial wealth. They have a large house, lease new cars every year, boats and many other toys. I admire their focus on a single objective. I don't judge them because of it, yet it's not the path I would travel.

    I think for me money has been a necessity but not an obsession, and if I were to measure my wealth, it would be my general well-being over the years and the time I spent with the people closest to me.

    Is that philosophical view? I don't know.
     
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  3. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

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    I thank that you have half of what woud make you the most happy... in that you woud still find pleasure in the mundane... now all you need is some millions for the pleasure of the security it woud brang.!!!
     
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  5. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    But then I would be saddled with the possibility of losing it (Just joking). Yeah, it would bring more financial security, I suppose. I wouldn't complain if I fell into a pit of money.
     
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  7. river Valued Senior Member

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    More " financial security , I suppose " ? No doubt .
     
  8. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    I suppose. Does being wealthy financially buy us security? It seems that I read a story where someone's 4.5 million dollar ring was taken off her hand, including a few other expensive bobbles. I could win millions in the lottery tonight and die of a heart attack tomorrow morning.
     
  9. river Valued Senior Member

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    You can be rich without being extravagant .
     
  10. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

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    People like us who are content wit a simple life woudnt need expensive jewlery... but bein able to afford havin the car fixed or buy a new stove... etc. when needed sure is a pleasure compaired to havin to do wit-out such essentials... an bein able to aford health care... good house... new car... its fantastic for simple guys like us who have gone thru many lean years... e.g... not born rich.!!!
     
  11. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    You can be rich and have little money. I'm not saying that money doesn't have its advantages, but look at those who do have financial wealth. Does money always equal contentment?
     
  12. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    Yep, that's a good point.
     
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  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Well, that's the thing. You are playing with the definitions of 'rich' and 'wealth'.

    If you choose to define wealth to mean 'happy with life' or 'loving and loved' or some other personal definition, then sure. But what does it do to the the question being asked?

    Maybe I was reading too much into your question. I read it as how is wealth (generally) measured? But it occurs to me that you may mean how do each of you measure wealth for yourself?

    I define wealth by how much of my discretionary time I can spend among nature, or at least out in the warm sun. I acknowledge that I have financial needs, as well as limitations, so I can't (i.e. choose not to) just go live in a shack on a mountain, but for me, the ability to maximize my free time in my yard, or on a hike, or in the warm October sunshine on my little boat in the lagoon (as I am doing while I write this), is the yardstick by which I measure my quality of life.

    I want enough money to be able to do those things - but no more - since making more money would directly impact my reasons for having money in the first place.
     
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  14. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Money only buys things and pays bills, it doesn’t buy you peace, and happiness. Now if you think that owning a ton of things is the essence of happiness, then that’s a different story. Lol

    The only good that I find about being wealthy is that it would allow me to spread the wealth to those in need. I give now, but to be wealthy would afford me the luxury of giving more.

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  15. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Money is the only thing that matters.
     
  16. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Only if that's all that matters to you.

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  17. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Everything else I already have and will always have.
     
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  18. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Value of own wealth: proximity toward ones ultimate goal.
    Value of other people's wealth: how much you'd be prepared to pay for what they have.

    Money is the means by which we often understand the latter but only as established through market forces, not through our own personal view.
    Yes, a yacht may cost £1m but that doesn't mean it has the same value to someone as, say, the ability for them to walk again that may cost £1m in biotech and physiotherapy.
     
  19. wellwisher

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    Wealth is connected to building a financial nest egg., It is not connected to practicing conspicuous consumption so you look like you have a lot of money. Wealth plans for the future, while conspicuous consumption lives in the moment. Accumulation is the operative word when it comes to wealth. Spending is not the operative word for wealth. A wealth of knowledge comes from accumulating knowledge.

    I watched a news special a few years back. The theme was how although many blacks were getting better jobs with higher pay; athletes were looked at, their wealth was less than that of whites. The difference had to do with these blacks having higher conspicuous consumption rates, and less accumulating. One black gentleman spent a lot of his money on a designer wardrobe. He looked very sharp, distinguished and wealthy, but this does not accumulate wealth.
     
  20. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    I always say that if I had millions of dollars I'd give most of it away. Go ahead and prove me wrong: Give me millions of dollars and watch me give it away.
     
  21. river Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah ; I got to say say ; the more money I would give . There are just so many programs that would help Humanity ; it's good to help Humanity ; in large and small ways .
     
  22. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    I'm not entirely sure that the remote cabin which Stringbean and his wife lived in, and were murdered at, even had electricity.

    So based on his outcome of even trying to live sub-normally, it might seem that unless either one's wealth or one's identity is successfully kept secret, then still proceeding with an authentic, simple or everyday life is difficult. Due to the security necessary to keep both the nagging do-gooders and the stealthy bad guys away.

    But then there's JD Salinger, who's net worth was estimated at 20 million dollars. Living as a hermit in the woods for decades, dying at the ripe old age of 91. But he did have high walls, vicious guard dogs, and a shotgun. So despite any minimum of ostentatiousness and affluent possessions, perhaps there really wasn't that much "everyday" about his reclusive, paranoid circumstances.
     
  23. river Valued Senior Member

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    Did you know him ?
     

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