How can unbelievers come to believe in God?

Discussion in 'Religion Archives' started by Enmos, Mar 10, 2011.

  1. decons scrambled egg Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    144
    On the contrary, it is a matter of non-arguable and generally accepted proof. Until that day, encounters of extraterrestrial or religious kind will be claimed to be personal privileges.

    As we witness throughout our lives, persons have individual minds that can play tricks to their owners, lie, or simply believe. Therefore, we require proof when we are socially urged to believe the existence of something.

    For example, nobody questions the life-saving, or at least `life-repairing`, function of the medical science. Although it does not offer 100% success rate, it is universally accepted as the best option. It is because we all, to a varying degree, witnessed its efficiency.

    On the other hand, you cannot convince a cancer patient about the existence of the cure for cancer until that person is cured.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. kwhilborn Banned Banned

    Messages:
    2,088
    I recently started a post in comparative religion where I tell how I became religious when I was atheist. Its called "my journey from atheism to belief in god". I am not going to paste it here as it was a new thread only a week ago.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Itseemstome Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    103
    As I said before Robittybob added an interesting thought to my search. It occurred to me that this superior intelligence could not read minds! So I mused out loud on what it was like to die! Cheerful subject but one that does not worry me. A few days later I woke with a dream in which something said 'This is what it is like to die'. As clear as that. Could explain why all religions go for audible prayer. Incidentally, unlikely as it might seem, this is completely true. Delightful.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
  8. Adstar Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,782
  9. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
  10. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    Not at all.

    People who say they want to "live in the moment" may have various intentions behind that.

    Some of those who want to "live in the moment" want to forget a painful past or stop worrying about a painful future.

    Some of those who want to "live in the moment" want to enjoy life more - and now and here.

    Some of those who want to "live in the moment" do so because they realize that the only solution to misery is proper action, and that the here and now is the only place and time in which one can act.
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    16,491
    I am in the rather odd and lonely position of being an "unwilling atheist".

    I wish there were a God. It would be an awesome world where someone really were looking out for us, watching us, even judging us, giving us reason not to murder our brethren. It would be a huge burden lifted off our shoulders. It would mean we donlt have to really be grown-ups, we can remain children, who still have parents to provide wisdom and guidance, to pick us up, dust us off and set us one our way again, even to to discipline us. It would mean there is a right versus wrong in the universe, not just our own consciences to guide us to doing good.

    Seriously, wouldn't that be awesome? It would make life very simple. It would be a warm, cozy blanket I could wrap myself in every night, knowing someone is looking out for me.

    Alas, wishing something to be so does not make it so. It is human nature to seek order, fate, destiny, divine justice and even luck (we all do it, you know you do), even if it isn't really there.
     
  12. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    The most fundamental worry isnt a 'painful' future...its NO future.

    A prospect that can appear close at hand...in a flash.
     
  13. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    An optimal state of enjoyment for most healthy people is an orgasm...during which it is almost impossible to avoid 'living in the moment'.
     
  14. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    I don't think this is an "odd" or "lonely" position at all that are you are at; I know many people who are in the same position.


    Sure.


    Here', we disagree.
    It is not clear how theism would automatically mean immaturity nor a permissive attitude toward immature behavior.


    I do think that already the process of thinking about the numerous issues related to that which tends to be called "God" forces one to become more mature. Forces - if one is to make any progress and have any resemblance of peace of mind.


    Being under someone's protection doesn't automatically absolve one of the responsibility for the decisions one makes.


    Indeed.


    Skepticism shouldn't simply transform into certainty one way or another.
     
  15. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    What do you mean by "no future"?
    'Non-existence'?

    Ending up homeless and on the street is a future, albeit not one that many would desire.
     
  16. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    Life isnt something that is WON...eventually life itself is LOST.

    A reality no 'proper action' can amend.
     
  17. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    This is a view not held by everyone. Traditional Buddhists and Hindus, for example, characteristically do not hold such a view.
     
  18. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    Although far more desirable than NO future...non-existence.
     
  19. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    Indeed they do...the principle of 'impermanence' is a cornerstone of Asian philosophy.
     
  20. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    In context, I was referring to their concepts of rebirth / reincarnation - ie. permanence, continuity.
     
  21. Carcano Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,865
    Rebirth and 'samsara' as they call it...is an aspect of impermanence.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2012
  22. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    There is something which continually is reborn, which continually reincarnates.
    That something is permanent (at least in Hinduism), and it can be neither won nor lost.
     
  23. spidergoat Liddle' Dick Tater Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    53,966
    It's only as permanent as matter.
     

Share This Page