How a hot object emit heat radiation?

Discussion in 'The Cesspool' started by jcc, Jul 25, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jcc Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    412
    Heat an iron ball to red hot, put it in a glass bowl, how is the heat radiating out?

    Are the electrons in the iron bar change orbitals and emit photons?

    Are the iron atoms vibrating and radiating out gravitational vibration?
     
  2. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    27,534
    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/transferring-heat-through-radiation.html

    If you have any problems in understanding simple explanations then I suggest a problem/s may be present
    [1]You may not have sufficient understanding/comprehension abilities.[2] You are a child whose comprehension/understanding abilities are not developed.[3]You have an agenda blinding you to science.[4] You are trolling.
     
  4. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,133
    Magic.

    Magic.

    Magic.

    Satisfied now?
     
  6. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,304
    No.
    Yes.
     
  8. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,697
    The answer is the same as the other 20 times you asked the same question. No.

    You are so tiring and boring.

    Your post has been reported for trolling.
     
  9. Kittamaru Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. Adieu, Sciforums. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    13,938
    You have asked this question in various forms several times... you have been given the answer several times, as well as shown how to find it yourself. You are trolling at this point
     
  10. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    37,791
    Part of the heat leaves the iron ball as photons, which propagate out into space, carrying some energy away. Part of the heat is transferred to the air and to the glass bowl by conduction - i.e. direct contact between the vibrating atoms in the ball and in the bowl/air. Part of the heat is carried away by convection - air atoms near the ball are heated by conduction and they then rise up - the motion carries heat away.

    So, the short answers is: radiation, conduction, convection.

    Yes.

    Yes, but the energy lost this way is utterly negligible compared with the processes I've already mentioned.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page