Holographic Memory for Androids? Yes.

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by Rick, Apr 9, 2002.

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  1. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    As i discussed before,we are at present searching for our all-Illusive high memory Android being like HAL.
    compare the memory of Human brain with our at present computers and you"ll know how seriously far we are in this respect.the solution which is most promising may be Holographic memory.take a peep at basics in this article taken from Howstuffworks.
    The Basics
    Holographic memory offers the possibility of storing 1 terabyte (TB) of data in a sugar-cube-sized crystal. A terabyte of data equals 1,000 gigabytes, 1 million megabytes or 1 trillion bytes. Data from more than 1,000 CDs could fit on a holographic memory system. Most computer hard drives only hold 10 to 40 GB of data, a small fraction of what a holographic memory system might hold.
    Polaroid scientist Pieter J. van Heerden first proposed the idea of holographic (three-dimensional) storage in the early 1960s. A decade later, scientists at RCA Laboratories demonstrated the technology by recording 500 holograms in an iron-doped lithium-niobate crystal, and 550 holograms of high-resolution images in a light-sensitive polymer material. The lack of cheap parts and the advancement of magnetic and semiconductor memories placed the development of holographic data storage on hold.

    Over the past decade, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and high-tech giants IBM and Lucent's Bell Labs have led the resurgence of holographic memory development. Prototypes developed by Lucent and IBM differ slightly, but most holographic data storage systems (HDSS) are based on the same concept. Here are the basic components that are needed to construct an HDSS:

    Blue-green argon laser
    Beam splitters to spilt the laser beam
    Mirrors to direct the laser beams
    LCD panel (spatial light modulator)
    Lenses to focus the laser beams
    Lithium-niobate crystal or photopolymer
    Charge-coupled device (CCD) camera
    When the blue-green argon laser is fired, a beam splitter creates two beams. One beam, called the object or signal beam, will go straight, bounce off one mirror and travel through a spatial-light modulator (SLM). An SLM is a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows pages of raw binary data as clear and dark boxes. The information from the page of binary code is carried by the signal beam around to the light-sensitive lithium-niobate crystal. Some systems use a photopolymer in place of the crystal. A second beam, called the reference beam, shoots out the side of the beam splitter and takes a separate path to the crystal. When the two beams meet, the interference pattern that is created stores the data carried by the signal beam in a specific area in the crystal -- the data is stored as a hologram.


    An advantage of a holographic memory system is that an entire page of data can be retrieved quickly and at one time. In order to retrieve and reconstruct the holographic page of data stored in the crystal, the reference beam is shined into the crystal at exactly the same angle at which it entered to store that page of data. Each page of data is stored in a different area of the crystal, based on the angle at which the reference beam strikes it. During reconstruction, the beam will be diffracted by the crystal to allow the recreation of the original page that was stored. This reconstructed page is then projected onto the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, which interprets and forwards the digital information to a computer.

    The key component of any holographic data storage system is the angle at which the second reference beam is fired at the crystal to retrieve a page of data. It must match the original reference beam angle exactly. A difference of just a thousandth of a millimeter will result in failure to retrieve that page of data.
    Desktop Holographic Data Storage
    After more than 30 years of research and development, a desktop holographic storage system (HDSS) is close at hand. There is still some fine tuning that must be done before such a high-density storage device can be marketed, but IBM researchers have suggested that they will have a small HDSS device ready as early as 2003. These early holographic data storage devices will have capacities of 125 GB and transfer rates of about 40 MB per second. Eventually, these devices could have storage capacities of 1 TB and data rates of more than 1 GB per second -- fast enough to transfer an entire DVD movie in 30 seconds. So why has it taken so long to develop an HDSS, and what is there left to do?
    When the idea of an HDSS was first proposed, the components for constructing such a device were much larger and more expensive. For example, a laser for such a system in the 1960s would have been 6 feet long. Now, with the development of consumer electronics, a laser similar to those used in CD players could be used for the HDSS. LCDs weren't even developed until 1968, and the first ones were very expensive. Today, LCDs are much cheaper and more complex than those developed 30 years ago. Additionally, a CCD sensor wasn't available until the last decade. Almost the entire HDSS device can now be made from off-the-shelf components, which means that it could be mass-produced.

    Although HDSS components are easier to come by today than they were in the 1960s, there are still some technical problems that need to be worked out. For example, if too many pages are stored in one crystal, the strength of each hologram is diminished. If there are too many holograms stored on a crystal, and the reference laser used to retrieve a hologram is not shined at the precise angle, a hologram will pick up a lot of background from the other holograms stored around it. It is also a challenge to align all of these components in a low-cost system.

    Researchers are confident that technologies will be developed in the next two or three years to meet these challenges. With such technologies on the market, you will be able to purchase the first holographic memory players by the time "Star Wars: Episode II" is released on home 3-D discs. This DVD-like disc would have a capacity 27 times greater than the 4.7-GB DVDs available today, and the playing device would have data rates 25 times faster than today's fastest DVD players
    .amazing,isnt it?
    hell,so Androids can have more memory than Human brain(i think memory of brain is 10 Terrabytes).

    imagine being able to record 100 movies on a disk the size of a CD - - or one day recording the contents of the Library of Congress on such a disk. These are the promises of holographic data storage.
    Holography enables storage densities that can far surpass the superparamagnetic and diffraction limits of traditional magnetic and optical recording. Holography can break through these density limits because it goes beyond the two-dimensional approaches of conventional storage technologies to write data in three dimensions. In addition, unlike conventional technologies which record data bit by bit, holography allows a million bits of data to be written and read out in single flashes of light, enabling data transfer rates as high as a billion bits per second (fast enough to transfer a DVD movie in about 30 seconds).

    With its powerful combination of high storage densities and rapid data transfer rates, holography stands poised to become a compelling choice for next-generation storage needs.

    days are not far,isnt it?

    Check out Attatched picture for Clarty of concepts...
    bye!
     
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  3. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    Here.
     
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  5. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    And this.


    bye!
     
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  7. kmguru Staff Member

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    The system looks like a basic hologram. The question is, howmuch info one can pack on a page and at what resolution? Remember those flat laser cards? they store data in pits just like the CD-ROM. Now can we photograph them or a large photolithography say an E-size lithograph? What is the total steps we can do and is it 270 degrees or 360 degrees?

    If we can store 1 GB with a step totation of 1000 times, we get 1TB. Now if we can stack it at 1 cm height per hologram, with a 10 cm stick, we can get 10 TB of data.

    Now that is cool...
     
  8. huh??? Registered Senior Member

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    3d CDs

    Interesting thread

    As for 3d memory, NMR might be the key to that. Reseach for precise NMR for quantum computers could lead to ultraprecise NMR for computer memory. As for existing 3d memory technology, I read somewhere that some company is looking into CDs that can be written all the way through the thickness of the CD, instead of just the surface like in today's cds. How does this work? Depending on the wavelength, different spectrums can penatrate a certain distance. The shorter the wavelength, the more powerful the beam is, the farther it can penatrate.
     
  9. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    huh???...

    "...instead of just the surface like in today's cds.?

    I was under the impression that they've already accomplished two
    level writing/reading on a CD. Am I wrong?

    Take care, and welcome to Sciforums.
     
  10. kmguru Staff Member

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    http://www.howstuffworks.com/dvd3.htm

    <font color="red" size="+1">Multi-Layer Storage</font><br>
    To increase the storage capacity even more, a DVD can have up to four layers, two on each side. The laser that reads the disc can actually focus on the second layer through the first layer. Here is a list of the capacities of different forms of DVDs:

    (Why I have so much blank space here?)
    <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="5" border="1" bgcolor=lightyellow align="left" width=420>
    <tr>
    <td><b>Format</b></td>
    <td><b><center>Capacity</center></b></td>
    <td><b><center>Approx. Movie Time</center></b></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td><font size="-1">Single-sided/single-layer</font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>4.38 GB</center></font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>2 hours</center></font></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td><font size="-1">Single-sided/double-layer</font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>7.95 GB</center></font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>4 hours</center></font></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td><font size="-1">Double-sided/single-layer</font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>8.75 GB</center></font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>4.5 hours</center></font></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    <td><font size="-1">Double-sided/double-layer</font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>15.9 GB</center></font></td>
    <td><font size="-1"><center>Over 8 hours</center></font></td>
    </tr>
    </table>
    <p>
    You may be wondering why the capacity of a DVD doesn't double when you add a whole second layer to the disc. This is because when a disc is made with two layers, the pits have to be a little longer, on both layers, than when a single layer is used. This helps to avoid interference between the layers, which would cause errors when the disc is played.
    <p>
     
  11. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    Thanks kmguru ...

    I'll be able to go to sleep tonight without wondering if I'm completely
    'out of it'!

    Q. How in the hell did you mess up your post like you did?

    Take care

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  12. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    Tables usually have that space problem...



    bye!
     
  13. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Apparently I just trialed and errored a bunch of changes to Kmguru's original table, and came up with just the point that it wasn't centred with caused the text to bleed down the right side.

    Centreing it, stops that occuring but it still leaves a space above the table.

    It's truly an oddity though, as my Signature uses a table, with my handle and a break directly above the table code, and it doesn't make so many spaces.

    I could just be due to the fact that the table is nested within a table. And Sciforums is built with tables. (Or there might be a board option that increases the spacing to stop information being too close to the borders.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2002
  14. kmguru Staff Member

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    Any HTML code genius out there? I think, it has something to do with the way sciforums program handles HTML code. I have used a similar reply in one of the MSN forums, they go in perfectly.
     
  15. Rick Valued Senior Member

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    There re two things that i'd like to share:
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    1.)first,the size of Holo g memory is a great advantage.Imangine 10 Terrabytes.(what Windows could do with that?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    )
    2.)second,the size of that 10 TB could be fitted into a cubic crystal.a small sugar cube,imagine.


    there's a marked difference to what existing technology has to offer.CD,DVD size is large as compared to Holographic cubes and storage is also very very less.




    bye!
     
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