Hit or Miss computing

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by Pine_net, May 28, 2002.

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  1. Pine_net Chaos Product Registered Senior Member

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    Okay, here are some questions I'm trying to find answers to.

    1.) Could a distributed computer network solve for a constant of values derived from a set command list? All possible combinations is what I'm speaking of here. The list doesn't have to be long as long as the list is highly ordered. Take the table of elements as an example. Could a distributed network solve for all possible molecules? It would be a crazy task, but a distributed possibility I would think. Most values would be garbage of course, but some results could produce new materials. Just one use mind you...


    2.) Can an A.I. be modeled loosely like this? No real command list except for the ones it could generate given a problem. Yes No Maybe lists. Throw away the garbage and keep the right answers.
     
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  3. kmguru Staff Member

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    1. Dont know. Depends on many factors mostly how the programming was done.


    2. YES.
     
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  5. Adam §Þ@ç€ MØnk€¥ Registered Senior Member

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    My little brother was running a programme at home much like Seti@home, but it involved modelling molcules for the purposes of finding drugs suitable for cancer research or something.

    Can distributde computing be used to simply run through heaps of number combinations? Absolutely. After all, everything you run through computer is just numbers anyway. Modelling possible molecules is the same as running decryption such as distributed.net does.
     
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  7. huh??? Registered Senior Member

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    While D-computing is nice for some things, a Quantum computing could get the job done a lot quicker. I mean, D-computing is useful when actually computing or searching for something, like seti@home. But for just running through numbers or molecules (which by the way are infinite, you can never search through <I>every</I> one) you would be much better off using a 1000 or so qubit quantum computer
     
  8. Pine_net Chaos Product Registered Senior Member

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    So, how many qubits could you compute with if it were possible? Can it be something crazy like a googleplex qubit quantum computer?
     
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