Higgs Boson News to be announced Dec 13th

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by Pincho Paxton, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. CptBork Robbing the Shalebridge Cradle Valued Senior Member

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    Sorry but there are plenty of systems in which a system's gravitational energy is related to its temperature. Example: ideal gases in a gravitational field whose pressures/densities at various altitudes are described by the barometric equation. Don't know where you're getting your info from, but it's no good.
     
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  3. wlminex Banned Banned

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    From common sense: Temperature is a kinetic energy factor . . . gravity is a potential energy factor. Kinetic energy can counter potential energy . . . that's how we launch rockets.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
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  5. CptBork Robbing the Shalebridge Cradle Valued Senior Member

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    From common sense: temperature has a more sophisticated meaning than what you're trying to attribute to it. How much do you know about statistical mechanics?

    Secondly, what the heck is an "energy factor"?
     
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  7. wlminex Banned Banned

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    I agree . . . . Just trying to make the comparative concept simple . . . . . in a system involving temperature and gravity (among other things) temperature is 1 kinetic energy factor . . . . gravity is 1 potential energy factor. If you're more comfortable . . . just remove the "factor" references. It's not "rocket science"!
     

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