Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    In Canada, we pronounce it "Eep".
     
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  3. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    "eccetera, eccetera"...derived from ecceteric...........

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    oops..... et cetera?

    We need a new "alternate" version of the dictionary

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  5. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    We try to pronounce it as the Belgians and French: Eep-re. But English people do not do the French R very well.
     
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  7. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Ah, we undoubtedly suffer a genetic normality that results in a dislike of all things continental, especially French.

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  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    ..............Especially if we have a French name, like "Farage".

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  9. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Is there any reason for this ridiculous sentiment? I would call it a genetic abnormality, if anything.

    Mandelbrot, Curie, and a host of French scientist have contributed to our science.
    Well, perhaps that's the reason. We didn't invent those things and that is clearly unacceptable.
    https://www.ranker.com/list/famous-scientists-from-france/reference
     
  10. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    wot ya talk'n bout ?
     
  11. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Is there a thread for "evil help with English." Sounds like it would be lots more fun.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Relax, that was I think just a humorous reference to Brexsh1t. Anyway it doesn't apply to me: I had a French wife (deceased) and have a bilingual son with both nationalities. (I am what Theresa May calls a "citizen of nowhere".). But my French is not very good, even so.
     
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  13. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Not necessarily Brexit - just the general fun we poke at the French. I would have thought the wink emoji would have been sufficient to convey that it was not to be taken seriously (so as to avoid Poe's Law). But seems even then things are not so immune. C'est la vie, so to speak.

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  14. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, it seems that we have a set of countries who's population for some strange reason always have been targeted for (bad) humor.

    I wonder what psychology lies behind this need to put others down or make fun of their customs.
     
  15. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Every country has another they gently mock, usually their nearest neighbour with whom they've had centuries of entanglement. We mock the French and the Irish for example. The other UK countries mock the English. The French mock the Germans, the Scandinavian countries mock each other etc. Harmless teasing. Don't overthink it.
     
  16. geordief Registered Senior Member

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    The amusing also mock the humourless I have heard.
     
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  17. gmilam Valued Senior Member

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    I've heard that the Scots love to hate the English. And the English hate to love the Scots.
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    And both the Dutch and the French make fun of the Belgians.

    Not sure who the Belgians make fun of. Maybe, like the Canadians, they have immunity because they do not take themselves too seriously in the first place - possibly the best defence of all!

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  19. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    inter alia

    do we still use this word?
     
  20. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    I wouldn't say it is common but it is still used. It's one of the many Latin phrases that include, inter alia, such things as non sequitur, a priori, post mortem, ad hoc, bona ride etc.
     
  21. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    It's a Latin phrase, and it means "among other things".

    It is sometimes used in formal writing, particularly legal documents, but other than that it isn't used very often.
     
  22. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    It is imperative for you to study hard in order to pass examination.

    Correct?
     
  23. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    It was imperative that you should reach the office before 9 am to report to work every morning.
     

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