Hash is healthy!

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by UNIVERSE TODAY, Jun 22, 2006.

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  1. ghost7584 Registered Senior Member

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    There are several versions of what really killed Bruce Lee. This is the one that I believe.
    A baptist doctor that treated Lee in the hospital months before his death said that Lee was using hashish to ease the stress of movie making. This caused his brain to swell for which he was hospitalized and went down to 126 lbs before beginning to film the game of death movie. The doctor warned him that using hashish could kill him. He used it again and had fatal brain swelling which did kill him.
    The story put out about alergic reaction to a headache medicine, I believe to be false. They did not want the public to know about his addiction to hashish.
    Death was publicly declared misadventure.
     
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  3. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    5,502
    Try to find even one case in the medical literature where hashish has caused fatal brain swelling. People worry over the stupidest shit. They let themselves be used for lame-ass reasons, too, like allowing themselves to be alarmed by alarmist statements like pot going from 9 to 14 percent THC. That "high potency pot" canard has been around for forty years. They recycle it about once a decade. The people who let themselves be panicked about it are jackasses. They may actually prove that they are unworthy of being allowed to make decisions. But the people who use them that way are swindlers and shouldn't be allowed to do anything, at all. The freedoms that they take do not belong to them. The space they take up in our minds is stolen at a huge cost to us. This kind of panic-mongering prohibitionist SHIT belongs on the garbage heap of history.
     
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  5. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    i have not heard or read of a single case of an thc overdose causing death.
    it would help if you can provide some links.
     
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  7. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    I don't know about overdose but cannabis is an independent contributing factor in the development of psychosis, especially when its use begins in the teens.

    "Early use of cannabis did appear to increase the risk of psychosis. For psychotic symptoms, a dose-related effect of cannabis use was seen, with vulnerable groups including individuals who used cannabis during adolescence, those who had previously experienced psychotic symptoms, and those at high genetic risk of developing schizophrenia. In conclusion, the available evidence supports the hypothesis that cannabis is an independent risk factor, both for psychosis and the development of psychotic symptoms. Addressing cannabis use, particularly in vulnerable populations, is likely to have beneficial effects on psychiatric morbidity."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=15871146&query_hl=13&itool=pubmed_docsum

    It has also been significantly correlated to suicidal thoughts in adolescents

    "The specific "Q 2000" test was used to question 600 adolescents, from Tuzla and Sarajevo Cantons, with the same gender and age distribution and rural-urban ambient. The more prevailing suicidal idea occurrence was observed in cannabis abusers (50.0%) and alcohol abusers (36.6%) in comparison to non-abusers regardless gender and/or living ambient (settlement types) (19.5% and 17.6% per each, x2 = 17.184 p = 0.00001). The augmentation in number of suicidal ideas was not observed in tobacco smokers."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=14528719&query_hl=29&itool=pubmed_docsum

    "This paper reviews the epidemiology of suicidal behaviour and cannabis use among adolescents and looks at the relationship of these behaviours regionally and internationally. The Caribbean islands have an established use of cannabis with higher suicidal rates, which provides an ideal setting to investigate the interrelationship of these disorders. Preliminary research findings in Trinidad indicate high rates of cannabis use among school students with higher rates in vocational schools compared to grammar schools. Utilising the CAPE questionnaire, depressive and psychotic experiences were common findings in adolescent cannabis users with a significant preponderance of depressive experiences (p<0.01). Our findings suggest that there is a convincing relationship between suicidal behaviour and cannabis use, the latter awakening depressive experiences."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16088340&query_hl=36&itool=pubmed_docsum
     
  8. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    5,502
    I can't see how anyone can prove one way or another about a causal relationship. It makes a lot of sense that people who are schizophrenic, psychotic, or suicidal to begin with become users to cope with their problems. Whenever they can, psychiatrists make people into drug users to cope with these problems. They hammer into people's heads the idea that they cannot live without the drug. Marijuana is easier for a person to take than the psychiatric drugs are, too. What it does is more controllable and it doesn't feel nearly as creepy.

    I am sure that this evidence is good enough for those who pretend that they're protecting us when they are actually robbing us at gunpoint.
     
  9. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    OK how about this?

    There is some evidence that the majority of cannabis users are susceptible to bipolar disorders and cannabis use can affect population expression of manic symptoms.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16793142&query_hl=38&itool=pubmed_DocSum

    Or this?

    " It is concluded that prenatal exposure to either maternal smoking, alcohol or cannabis use is related to some common neurobehavioral and cognitive outcomes, including symptoms of ADHD (inattention, impulsivity), increased externalizing behavior, decreased general cognitive functioning, and deficits in learning and memory tasks."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16095697&query_hl=42&itool=pubmed_docsum

    Don't get me wrong; I'm not against legalising the drug; just be aware that there are safety issues
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2006
  10. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    5,502
    Your links don't work.

    The same hucksters who have been wrong before bring in "new" material and dress it up fancy, to recycle the argument. They think they are credible therefore they are credible no matter how many times they are wrong. This is not a level playing field.
     
  11. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    This may be true for those who study cannabis as a drug addiction; however cannabis is also studied for its pharmacological benefits and these studies support the findings from epidemiological data.

    "A marijuana withdrawal syndrome is only recently gaining acceptance as being clinically significant. Similarly, laboratory animals exhibit both tolerance and dependence following chronic administration of cannabinoids. These animal models are being used to evaluate the high degree of plasticity that occurs at the molecular level in various brain regions following chronic cannabinoid exposure. In this review, we describe recent advances that have increased our understanding of the impact of chronic cannabinoid administration on cannabinoid receptors and their signal transduction pathways. Additionally, we discuss several potential pharmacotherapies that have been examined to treat marijuana dependence."
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16596793&query_hl=56&itool=pubmed_DocSum

    "Recent developments have implicated cannabinoid CB1 receptors as a novel target for a new class of therapeutic agents used to treat drug addiction. CB1 receptors are expressed in the motivational circuitry of the brain and modulate drug seeking. Blockade of the CB1 receptor is particularly effective in reducing cue-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, an animal analogue of cue-induced relapse in human addicts. These relapse-preventing properties are observed with different classes of abused drug (i.e. psychostimulants, opiates, nicotine and alcohol). In addition, recent evidence indicates a more general role of CB1 receptors in reward-related memories, which is consistent with the proposed role of endocannabinoids in memory-related plasticity. Relapse-preventing actions and inhibitory effects on weight gain were confirmed recently in clinical trials with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. Collectively, these clinical and preclinical studies suggest that antagonists of CB1 receptors offer a novel approach in the treatment of addictive behaviours."
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=15992935&query_hl=56&itool=pubmed_DocSum

    Marijuana use has been associated with disordered cognition across several domains influenced by the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here, we review the contribution of preclinical research to understanding the effects of cannabinoids on cognitive ability, and the mechanisms by which cannabinoids may affect the neurochemical processes in the PFC that are associated with these impairments. In rodents, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists produces deficits in working memory, attentional function and reversal learning. These effects appear to be largely dependent on CB(1) cannabinoid receptor activation. Preclinical studies also indicate that the endogenous cannabinoid system may tonically regulate some mnemonic processes. Effects of cannabinoids on cognition may be mediated via interaction with neurochemical processes in the PFC and hippocampus. In the PFC, cannabinoids may alter dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic transmission. These mechanisms may underlie cognitive impairments observed following marijuana intake in humans, and may also be relevant to other disorders of cognition. Preclinical research will further enhance our understanding of the interactions between the cannabinoid system and cognitive functioning.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16574226&query_hl=56&itool=pubmed_DocSum

    Cannabinoids represent one of the most widely used hallucinogenic drugs and induce profound alterations in sensory perception and emotional processing. Similarly, the dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter system is critical for the central processing of emotion and motivation. Functional disturbances in either of these neurotransmitter systems are well-established correlates of the psychopathological symptoms and behavioral manifestations observed in addiction and schizophrenia. Increasing evidence from the anatomical, pharmacological and behavioral neuroscience fields points to complex functional interactions between these receptor systems at the anatomical, pharmacological and neural systems levels. An important question relates to whether these systems act in an orchestrated manner to produce the emotional processing and sensory perception deficits underlying addiction and schizophrenia. This review describes evidence for functional neural interactions between cannabinoid and DA receptor systems and how disturbances in this neural circuitry may underlie the aberrant emotional learning and processing observed in disorders such as addiction and schizophrenia.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16699809&query_hl=56&itool=pubmed_DocSum

    Cannabinoids represent one of the most commonly used hallucinogenic drug classes. In addition, cannabis use is a primary risk factor for schizophrenia in susceptible individuals and can potently modulate the emotional salience of sensory stimuli. We report that systemic activation or blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulates emotional associative learning and memory formation in a subpopulation of neurons in the mammalian medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that receives functional input from the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Using in vivo single-unit recordings in rats, we found that a CB1 receptor agonist potentiated the response of medial prefrontal cortical neurons to olfactory cues paired previously with a footshock, whereas this associative responding was prevented by a CB1 receptor antagonist. In an olfactory fear-conditioning procedure, CB1 agonist microinfusions into the mPFC enabled behavioral responses to olfactory cues paired with normally subthreshold footshock, whereas the antagonist completely blocked emotional learning. These results are the first demonstration that cannabinoid signaling in the mPFC can modulate the magnitude of neuronal emotional learning plasticity and memory formation through functional inputs from the BLA.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...uids=16775133&query_hl=56&itool=pubmed_DocSum
     
  12. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    17,455
    let's not forget you also get a withdrawal syndrome when you stop drinking coffee.
     
  13. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    Yup and it is absolutely forbidden during pregnancy due to teratogenic effects
     
  14. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    17,455
    the point i am trying to make here is that marijuana addiction is psycological not physical.
     
  15. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    Nope its proven to be dose related; definitely physical

    see the second link in my previous post
     
  16. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    17,455
    links?
     
  17. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    17,455
    Regular users of marijuana can develop a marked tolerance to the drug, but physical dependence characterized by significant withdrawal symptoms has not been well established in either human or animal studies.
    http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/0509.html
     
  18. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    5,502
    Yeah, they drag out all these "great new findings" to justify a U-turn in drug policy. You know what? I still think it's a crock of shit. No supporters of prohibition have ever been able to listen to reason, not ever. They've used violence to prevent themselves from having to listen to reason. Why in hell should anyone listen to them now when they think they've got some actual scientific evidence? They're not going to listen to the heap of evidence that shows that cannabinoids are healthy for you.
     
  19. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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    9,686
    This is such a tired and ludicrous argument.

    Marijuana is a 'gateway drug' simply for the fact that it is illegal.
    You grow accustomed to being a 'drug user'. A 'criminal'.
    Marijuana and cocaine and heroin and all the others are all linked under a common heading.
    Thus, smoking marijuana is entering into a field of behaviors that are all similar.
    You're already a criminal and a drug user. Might as well try the others....
    Right?


    Or you can view it as a lifestyle choice.
    In this context, one would have to look at tobacco and alcohol as gateway drugs as they are the first products imbibed by a person entering into a party lifestyle.

    Candy might actually be the first gateway as it indicates a predisposition to pleasure seeking...
     
  20. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    These studies are from pharmacological journals that are exploring cannabis as a drug; they are regulated for safety and results are statistically controlled for simultaneous addictions or population characteristics. I also deliberately used data from different countries (US, UK, Netherlands) to ensure a wider perspective. Pharmacologists investigate a wide variety of plant extracts for potential drug benefits. Cannabis is only one of them.
     
  21. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    72,822
    I have no arguments against legalising it; merely against promoting it as a "safe" drug with "health benefits"
     
  22. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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    9,686
    What do you feel is more harmful about Marijuana?
    The drug itself? Or the method of ingesting it?
     
  23. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    17,455
    A synthetic chemical similar to the active ingredient in marijuana makes new cells grow in rat brains. What is more, in rats this cell growth appears to be linked with reducing anxiety and depression. The results suggest that marijuana, or its derivatives, could actually be good for the brain.
    http://www.newscientist.com/channel/being-human/drugs-alcohol/dn8155
     
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