Gravities Influence On Light

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience Archive' started by Prosoothus, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Actually I found something in a recent issue of New Scientist involving the Chinese investigating the potential of Gravitation fluctations caused during an Eclipse.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20327183.800-eclipse-sparks-hunt-for-gravity-oddity.html

    Of course it's suggesting that Light has an effect on gravity, but obviously the results to their readouts will give at least a starting point to actually answering if it's a case of this.

    To be honest it would actually make sense that photonic energy from the sun would cause an increase in waveformations on those atoms that fields are "pinged" (Very technical term for striking a field with a photon.)

    (if China proves this, I guess their New Scientific Age will be the "Ping Dynasty")
     
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  3. Prosoothus Registered Senior Member

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    Stryder,

    That was an interesting article you posted. I have no idea how an eclipse would influence gravity on the surface of the Earth. It just doesn't make sense. I wonder if gravity increased or decreased during the eclipse, the article doesn't say.

    It doesn't have to be photons, it can be some other particles from the Sun. (Maybe even dark matter

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    ). Or it might not be the Sun at all, it might be the Moon.

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  5. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    I'd prefer to keep the reasoning in line with what we've already got, rather than start inventing some sort of exotic carrier wave that didn't exist before the experiment.

    All I'm suggesting is that some photons or at least their waves are likely to cause radiation decay which would effect molecular bonds and likely electron orbits. This would likely cause atoms to exert more energy when being lit than when being devoid of light, which in turn would effect the overall fields they emit. (In this instance Gravity)

    Of course I'll leave it to budding scientists to work out how to measure that or of course fob it off with some mathematical prowess.
     
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