Frank Gehry buildings

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by Magical Realist, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    One thing about Frank Gehry's architecture--you'll pretty much know it when you see it. Gehry entirely deconstructs the idea of the building as a box or container in which there is a discrete inside and outside. Each building is a meditation on force, and flow, and decontainment, and the dynamic convolution of the geometrical plane. Here's some of his best examples:

    "Liquid architecture. It's like jazz - you improvise, you work together, you play off each other, you make something, they make something..." (Frank Gehry)

    "To me, every day is a new thing. I approach each project with a new insecurity, almost like the first project I ever did. And I get the sweats. I go in and start working, I'm not sure where I'm going. If I knew where I was going I wouldn't do it." (Frank Gehry)

    "Your best work is your expression of yourself. Now, you may not be the greatest at it, but when you do it, you’re the only expert."— FRANK GEHRY


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    Last edited: Apr 3, 2015
    cosmictotem likes this.
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  3. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Ugly indulgences of the starchitect's ego. They don't relate to the humans that would actually use them. They embody everything that is wrong with modern architecture.
     
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  5. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    Creativity like this is direly missing in society today. I'm glad to see things that are unique and different even though they might be difficult to actually build and live in. There are but a few of these architects today around the world and I'm glad I get to peak into their imaginations and walk with them through time.
     
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  7. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    "In February 1998, at the age of 91, Philip Johnson, the godfather of modern architecture, who 40 years earlier had collaborated with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe on the iconic Seagram Building, in Manhattan, traveled to Spain to see the just-completed Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. He stood in the atrium of the massive, titanium-clad structure with its architect, Frank Gehry, as TV cameras from Charlie Rosecaptured him gesturing up to the torqued and sensually curving pillars that support the glass-and-steel ceiling and saying, “Architecture is not about words. It’s about tears.” Breaking into heavy sobs, he added, “I get the same feeling in Chartres Cathedral.” Bilbao had just opened its doors, but Johnson, the principal apostle of the two dominant forms of architecture in the 20th century—Modernism and Postmodernism—and the design establishment’s ultimate arbiter, was prepared to call it on the spot. He anointed Gehry “the greatest architect we have today” and later declared the structure “the greatest building of our time.”

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    Five years after Johnson’s death, in 2005, Vanity Fair has asked 90 of the world’s leading architects, teachers, and critics to name the five most important buildings, monuments, and bridges completed since 1980, as well as the most significant structure built so far in the 21st century. The survey’s results back up Johnson decisively: of the 52 experts who ultimately participated in the poll—including 11 Pritzker Prize winners and the deans of eight major architecture schools—28 voted for the Guggenheim Bilbao. That was nearly three times as many votes as the second-place building received. Therefore it seems fair to conclude that the 81-year-old, Canadian-born Gehry is the most important architect of our age. (He received four additional votes for three other projects: the Walt Disney Concert Hall, in Los Angeles; Millennium Park, in Chicago; and his house in Santa Monica.)"===http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2010/08/architecture-survey-201008
     
  8. cosmictotem Registered Senior Member

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    Phenomenal.
     

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