Floods

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by timojin, Sep 28, 2017.

  1. river

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    9,791
    See that's the thing , I would like to know the sea salt content of the soil in which these fossils were found .

    Why ?

    Because I would like to know if the floods were of sea water or fresh water .
     
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  3. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Soil? Do you think there is soil on the ocean floor?
     
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  5. river

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    Sediment I should have said . Correction noted and agreed to .
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    The point is, the rock is the only thing that was part of the ocean. Anything else came from detritus after the uplifting of rock from the ocean's floor. Weathering took care of any salt long ago.
     
  8. river

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    9,791
    Perhaps , but if the fossils are also imbeded in the sediment and rock , deeper into , then weathering wouldn't have gotten to all sediment and fossils . And therefore wouldn't have washed away all the sea salt either .
     
  9. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Maybe, maybe not. Who says that rock from the ocean has salt in it?

    "Tholeiitic basalt is relatively rich in silica and poor in sodium. Included in this category are most basalts of the ocean floor, most large oceanic islands, and continental flood basalts such as the Columbia River Plateau."

    From Wikipedia.
     
  10. river

    Messages:
    9,791
    The sediment did .

    Further as you said weathering could have taken most of the sea salt away .

    But that salt would have gone down the mountain . Into the soil on which plants grow on .

    Now abviously plants , trees etc. do grow at some point below mountain peaks .

    So it would be interesting to find at what density and deepth sea salt is found in the soil on which these plants live in .
     
  11. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    I'm not sure how much "sediment" makes if from the ocean floor to the mountain top.
     
  12. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    I'm sorry, I did not make it clear enough.
    The rock of the upper thousand feet of Mt Everest is made up of those shells and skeletons. That's the rock, itself. They aren't "embedded" in it, they are it.

    That was washed to the ocean a million years ago - the region around Everest was in heavy rainfall for a long time. You might be able to find salt domes and deposits at great depth in the bedrock - as you can under the oil field region of Texas and Mexico and the Gulf - but nowhere near "soil" or anything that can get rained on.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
  13. river

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    9,791
    So your saying that the upper rock of Mt. Everest is made of calcium ?
     
  14. river

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    Neither do I .

    But sea salt is there somewhere from the top . Where from the top is the question .
     
  15. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    I posted the quote from the wiki-page on Mt Everest geology. The chemical makeup of those rocks is described there and in many places in more technical detail, and you can read all about it at your leisure. The upper thousand feet of Everest is rock largely made of the accumulated shells and skeletons of ocean dwelling animals. A layer of them, compressed and reduced from their original accumulation as they drifted to the bottom or died there, a thousand feet thick.
    Any easily dissolved compounds in soil exposed to rainfall for a million years is probably back in the ocean - downhill, where water goes - by now.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
  16. river

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    Again from wiki-page
     
  17. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Pick any source that you want to. Wiki is just easy to access. Trying to answer questions with facts is more rewarding that just asking questions and making up the answers.
     
  18. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Have you read it? You are asking questions it answers clearly and in non-technical language.
    This question, for example:
    The short answer is "no". Longer answers are found in the post you were replying to in confusion (shells and skeletons, etc), and then in the Wiki page referenced, and then wherever you want to look amid the tens of thousands of journals and textbooks and so forth in the big world of geology.
     
  19. river

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  20. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    That's a good start. Did that answer your questions?

    Note that down toward the bottom there is a description of how some kinds of limestone can form in the ocean - slowly precipitating on the bottom of a warm ocean - inorganically. That may account for much of the limestone at the top of Mt Everest, and of course like the shells and skeletons that compose the rest of it would include little or no salt - is that your point? That it isn't just ocean animal shells, but also ocean bottom precipitate, in that rock?
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
  21. river

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    9,791
    Some .

    What of the sea salt concentrations ?
     
  22. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    There aren't any, on Everest, as far as I know. No place for them to be - salt dissolves in rain, water flows downhill, and the whole world is downhill from Mt Everest.
    There probably hasn't been any salt in those rocks since dinosaurs roamed the planet. Why do you ask?
     
  23. river

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    9,791

    https://www.thoughtco.com/geology-of-mount-everest-755308, fossils at the peaks of Mt. Everest .

    Because I would like to know whether floods were from sea water or fresh water .

    Why ?

    Because in the biblical flood , the whole of the Earth was flooded . Which suggests that if true , sea salt should have concentrations in the silt that are high . Thats why I ask . I think that the silt will have low levels of sea salt .

    And that any flood(s) will be caused by ice age quick melting and/or polar shifts by the lithosphere on the mantle of Earths outer core .
     

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