Flat Earth?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by R1D2, Feb 2, 2018.

  1. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    Flat earthers dont want science. they want affirmation of their chosen religion.
    i have been backwards and forwards through their math, and their arguements.
    it is not a science, it is a belief.
    generaly they lack the mental concentration required to follow through on cross system functionality for science comparative evaluation.
    this panders to the beielf, that is leant on, as an emotional breaking point.
    this emotional breaking point has been propped up by the flat earth theory to serve as an emotional need.

    someone who is interested in science doesnt just say "stop" and stop studying something because they feel like their ego or emotions are not aligning with the scientific results coming out.
    they follow it tthrough to the end.
    get the results
    compare them with other types of results
    then test again.
    then again

    flat-earthers are incapable of this because they are operating from the same part of the brain as religous cults do.
     
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  3. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Most ancient theories had the flat disc being finite & surrounded by ocean.
    The disc was very thick.

    I know very little about recent flat Earth "theory".
    I have seen Earth's shadow on Luna. Which would not happen without Earth being between Sol & Luna.

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  5. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Disc shapes seem common in this universe?
     
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  7. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    The earliest reliably documented mention of the spherical Earth concept dates from around the 6th century BC when it appeared in ancient Greek philosophy but remained a matter of speculation until the 3rd century BC, when Hellenistic astronomy established the spherical shape of the Earth as a physical given. The paradigm was gradually adopted throughout the Old World during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. A practical demonstration of Earth's sphericity was achieved by Ferdinand Magellan and Juan Sebastián Elcano's expedition's circumnavigation (1519–1522).
    The concept of a spherical Earth displaced earlier beliefs in a flat Earth: In early Mesopotamian mythology, the world was portrayed as a flat disk floating in the ocean with a hemispherical sky-dome above, and this forms the premise for early world maps like those of Anaximander and Hecataeus of Miletus. Other speculations on the shape of Earth include a seven-layered ziggurat or cosmic mountain, alluded to in the Avesta and ancient Persian writings (see seven climes).
    The realization that the figure of the Earth is more accurately described as an ellipsoid dates to the 17th century, as described by Isaac Newton in Principia. In the early 19th century, the flattening of the earth ellipsoid was determined to be of the order of 1/300 (Delambre, Everest). The modern value as determined by the US DoD World Geodetic System since the 1960s is close to 1/298.25.

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  8. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_Reis_map

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/01/02/piri-reis-map-of-1513/


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  9. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    This thing keeps popping up.
     
  10. Michael 345 Bali tonight Valued Senior Member

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    Story of my life

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  11. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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    Pomponius Mela, the first Roman geographer, asserted that the earth had two habitable zones, a North and South one, but that it would be impossible to get into contact with each other because of the unbearable heat at the Equator.
    From the time of St Augustine, the Christian church was skeptical of the notion. Augustine asserted that "it is too absurd to say that some men might have set sail from this side and, traversing the immense expanse of ocean, have propagated there a race of human beings descended from that one first man."[8]
    In the Early Middle Ages, Isidore of Seville's widely read encyclopedia presented the term "antipodes" as referring to antichthones (people who lived on the opposite side of the Earth), as well as to a geographical place; these people came to play a role in medieval discussions about the shape of the Earth.[9] In 748, in reply to a letter from Saint Boniface, Pope Zachary declared the belief "that beneath the earth there was another world and other men, another sun and moon" to be heretical. In his letter, Boniface had apparently maintained that Vergilius of Salzburg held such a belief.[10][11][12][13]
    The antipodes being an attribute of a spherical Earth, some ancient authors used their perceived absurdity as an argument for a flat Earth.[14] However, knowledge of the spherical Earth was widespread during the Middle Ages, only occasionally disputed — the medieval dispute surrounding the antipodes mainly concerned the question whether people could live on the opposite side of the earth: since the torrid clime was considered impassable, it would have been impossible to evangelize them. This posed the problem that Christ told the apostles to evangelize all mankind; with regard to the unreachable antipodes, this would have been impossible. Christ would either have appeared a second time, in the antipodes, or left the damned irredeemable. Such an argument was forwarded by the Spanish theologian Alonso Tostado as late as the 15th century and "St. Augustine doubts" was a response to Columbus's proposal to sail westwards to the Indies.[15]
    The author of the Norwegian book Konungs Skuggsjá, from around 1250, discusses the existence of antipodes. He notes that (if they exist) they will see the sun in the north in the middle of the day and that they will have seasons opposite those of the Northern Hemisphere.
    The earliest surviving account by a European who had visited the Southern Hemisphere is that of Marco Polo (who, on his way home in 1292, sailed south of the Malay Peninsula). He noted that it was impossible to see the star Polaris from there.
    The idea of dry land in the southern climes, the Terra Australis, was introduced by Ptolemy and appears on European maps as an imaginary continent from the 15th century. In spite of having been discovered relatively late by European explorers, Australia was inhabited very early in human history; the ancestors of the Indigenous Australians reached it at least 50,000 years ago.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antipodes

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  12. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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  13. river

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    hmmm... it is obvious that some don't understand latitude and longitude and the significance of both , from the sea navigation perspective.

    the concept of a flat Earth allows neither latitude and longitude to exist in its fullest extent .

    it neither explains both poles
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  14. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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  15. Michael 345 Bali tonight Valued Senior Member

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