Fish oil vs. Krill oil

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Syzygys, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    Then start worrying when the human consumption increases. Until that, good old fish eat krill.
     
  2. river Valued Senior Member

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    DON'T DO IT!

    I hope they heed your warning
     
  3. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    Well, I have ran out of the fish oil supply, and considering what to get next. Here is an interesting study:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18460481

    Volunteers took fish, hemp and flaxseed oil and placebo for 3 months, and "The lipid parameters (TC, HDL-C, LDL-C and TG) did not show any significant differences among the four groups."

    So I guess it doesn't matter.... :)
     
  4. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Does that mean your looking for a quick solution, to a problem that may take years to develop? Also, you might want to review more information before deciding not to take any supplements at all. I do know that flaxseed oil goes rancid fairly quick (a month or two). It's better to get plain flaxseed and add it to a drink of some kind than the oil which is almost always rancid when you buy it.

    I believe a persons health depends more on what he or she does daily, such as taking proper nutrition and getting enough exercise. Yes proper nutrition is still a work in progress, but for the most part you will be doing something positive for yourself by following the current expert advice.
     
  5. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    Quick solution would be a week. After 3 months you bet there should be signs of effectiveness, or there is no point in taking them....
     
  6. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Maybe they should try and concentrate fish oil into smaller pill form. From my point of view I don't really care where I get my daily dose of Omega3. But I very much like the smaller pill the krill oil comes in.:D
     
  7. anna rose Registered Member

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    I used Fish Oil for years and about 2 years ago my Naturopathic Doctor recommended Krill Doctor Professional. I love using Krill Doctor since I can not tolerate the fishy burps and Mega Red does not contain enough nutrients which I get from Krill Doctor. So far I am happy with the results.
     
  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    This thread was 2 years old.

    If you have a "naturopathic doctor", the chances are you don't know much about science. Just eat healthily and you won't need to waste your money on any of this crap.
     
  9. kmguru Staff Member

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    Life goes on even if the thread is 2 years old...I may start using Krill Oil and see what happens....

    ...as to eating right, I have a kid who is allergic to seafood smell...perhaps the iodine...so, when he moves away, I will start my Salmon stuff...
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    How can anyone be allergic to a SMELL? Do you mean your child dislikes the smell? Or that he or she goes into anaphylactic shock?

    If it is just the former I would stick with it and try different things occasionally. Allowing all seafood to become a no-go area sounds like something only to be accepted in a child as a real last resort.
     
  11. kmguru Staff Member

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    He goes in to a shock...it is heavy allergy...that includes steroids, aspirin, iodine, Ultram, etc....that is amazing...
     
  12. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Source

    The proposed mechanism is what I would have expected based on my understanding of these things.
     
  13. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    OK thanks for this. How extraordinary. When they say small proteins called amines, do they mean proteins or amines? I had no idea one could be allergic to amines. Proteins I suppose I can understand more readily.
     
  14. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    I think it's both, to be honest.

    This source suggests protein fragments between six and eight carbon atoms long are, at least in part, responsible for the smell of fresh fish. There are also amines involved - Trimethylamine and dimethylamine. Although I must admit, my initial reaction to that was the same as yours, but then I thought about how people can be allergic to penicillin, which is a small non-protein molecule with an amine group in it and shrugged off my misgivings.
     
  15. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Can you post a link? I'd like to read it. When I tried searching the web, all I got in the way of scientific information was this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14533654

    which seems to be very sceptical.
     
  16. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    First two words in the second paragraph are an inline linke to a book on google books.

    That study is looking specifically at vaso-active amines.
     
  17. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Yes indeed, thanks. (the highlighting of links is not very obvious in the new format, I find - I missed it).
     
  18. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    If I may look beyond the relative health benefits of all three oils mentioned, I would chose hemp seed oil. The reason for this is that hemp has many other beneficial properties than both fish oil and flax oil.

    Fish oil of course requires removing a living organism from the oceans, which affects the oceans ecosystem. Many overfished areas are no longer useable for commercial fishing and pollution makes some fish unfit for human consumption. I wonder if this might also present additional problems in the manufacture of fish oils.

    But comparing flax seed oil with hemp seed oil, both are renewable and ecofriendly crops and in theory can supply an unlimited amount of oils and fibers. However, IMO, hemp yields a much larger volume and variety of products than flax per plant. Flax fibers can be used for production of linen and probably several other applications. However low THC hemp yields hundreds of uses in addition to oils and fabrics in various degrees of softness for clothing, paper, and rope (sisal) plus many other commercial products such as insulation. BMW now uses hemp in the interiors of its cars, to name one.

    Hemp has the same growing period as flax to reach maturity, but grows much taller and therefore yields more fiber that flax.. I am not sure, but I have a feeling that hemp also produces many more seeds (THC free) than flax, which would translate into cheaper oils.

    But most importantly, IMO, hemp's greatest asset is that it is an excellent CO2 scrubber, requires little water, and can grow in a much greater variety of soils than flax.

    All things considered, hemp is one of the most useful ecofriendly naturally occuring renewable resources for commercial and industrial use.

     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  19. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    What this doesn't tell you , though, is how useless hemp seed oil is as a cooking oil. Its low smoke point makes it unsuitable for frying: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp_oil

    Presumably that's we don't see it on the supermarket shelves.
     
  20. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    With due respect for your knowledge in chemistry, more recent information shows that hemp seed oil can be used for frying, when some caution is used. But it may not be an ideal frying oil. Apparently that honor goes to peanut oil, which also has a low smoke point.

    However, hemp seed oil may be found on the shelves of healthfood stores and even in supermarkets, according to the links below. Hemp seed oils contain almost no THC, if any at all, but do contain high levels of other chemicals which are beneficial to humans.

    I did not want to cite quotes from the links below, as I cannot vouch for their scientific accuracy. Nevertheless, I find the articles very interesting and informative.

    As hemp seems to finally have reclaimed its rightful position as one of the most versatile and beneficial naturally occurring plants, IMO, sharing information on fora like this may offer new insights to uninformed persons who previously were fed so much garbage from opponents to the use of anything that is associated with the word cannabis.

    I seriously urge anyone to read the following articles:

    http://www.thecannabischef.com/content/nutritious-and-delicious-hempseed-oil/
    and
    http://www.regenerativenutrition.com/content.asp?id=64
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014

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