first Gamma-Ray star system outside the Milky Way

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by paddoboy, Dec 24, 2016.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,225
    http://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-ha...t-gamma-ray-star-system-outside-the-milky-way

    NASA has discovered the first gamma-ray star system outside the Milky Way
    The brightest ever found.

    An international team of scientists has found the brightest gamma-ray binary ever seen, and it's the first to be seen outside the Milky Way galaxy.

    The team combined data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with those from other facilities and confirmed that what was once thought to be a high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB)was in fact, a gamma-ray binary system.

    Their findings have been published in The Astrophysical Journal.

    The newly found gamma-ray binary, named LMC P3, was discovered in a small nearby galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), located 163,000 light-years away.





    Gamma-ray binaries are systems wherein there are two stars, one orbiting the other.

    One is usually a massive star and the other is either a black hole or a neutron star (an extremely magnetic star), and are very rare, with only five found in our galaxy to date.

    And so far, LMC P3 is the most luminous gamma-ray binary system ever found in terms of gamma rays, X-rays, radio waves, and visible light.

    MORE...............
     
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  3. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    And no pesky life forms around that system to dirty things up. A germophobe's idea of squeaky clean. A good place to visit in a massively thick lead spaceship at a considerable distance.

    Artificial life forms would no doubt love it for the rad hard goodness and spectral purity. The perfect place to set up an orbiting ultra-clean manufacturing facility.
     
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