Favorite slang

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by sowhatifit'sdark, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. draqon Banned Banned

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    I use these:

    Ay Ay - yes
    okie dokie - yes
    nope - no

    and blank stare for everything else
     
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  3. MacGyver1968 Fixin' Shit that Ain't Broke Valued Senior Member

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    I tell you what...them thar Frogs shore do speak purdy. You can pretty much say anything in French and it sounds good.

    You could say "I just pooped myself with large quantities of diarreah" and it would sound nice.

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  5. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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    That is exactly what I think of Polish. Even the vilest Polish curse word sounds like poetry. Not a soft language, either, but harsh and strong....jaggedly beautiful.

    Gówno!!!!
     
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  7. pootshwan Registered Member

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    "two pigs fighting over a milkdud"

    ....referring to an obese womans ass.

    "check out the terd cutter on her"

    ....also referring to a woman's butt.
     
  8. pootshwan Registered Member

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    oh yea i forgot about

    "drop the cosby kids off at the pool"
    and
    "pinching a loaf"
     
  9. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    Taking a slash
    Getting a wet
    Sound as a quid
    Sparkoed
    Bollocksed
    Getting your jeb wet
    Shaking hands with the unemployed
    Smoking the doll
     
  10. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    lol

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    .


    peace.
     
  11. John99 Banned Banned

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    Terrible, terrible pootshwan.

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  12. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    My grandfather always called my a 'Little Toe-rag' now when I think of it properly that word is very offensive.

    peace.
     
  13. pootshwan Registered Member

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    haha..John99 why are those terrible?
     
  14. Steve100 O͓͍̯̬̯̙͈̟̥̳̩͒̆̿ͬ̑̀̓̿͋ͬ ̙̳ͅ ̫̪̳͔O Valued Senior Member

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    "Mutt and Jeff" is another I like.
     
  15. DiamondHearts Registered Senior Member

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    It's rather hilarious when some people refer to a single person as 'folk,' as in:

    What up folk?
     
  16. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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    "He'd steal the caffeine outta your bloodstream"
     
  17. John99 Banned Banned

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    bolt = leave

    peace out swabee = take care, see you mate.
     
  18. visceral_instinct Monkey see, monkey denigrate Valued Senior Member

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  19. John99 Banned Banned

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    yo my man, whats up?
     
  20. clusteringflux Version 1. OH! Valued Senior Member

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    " The folk " is a US street gang like the bloods or crips.
    People used to say "what up, blood?" in suburbia when I was growing up. Maybe it's similar to that.
     
  21. DiamondHearts Registered Senior Member

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    Not necessarily true. I was in the rural south when I heard it. I've never heard it in the north.
     
  22. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    We do exactly the same thing when we use "folks" in the plural: I'm going to spend the summer with my folks at their beach house. People use it indiscriminately to mean "people," so by back-formation one folk should be one person.

    We use "people" incorrectly too. It is not the plural of person!
    Sure, but "bolt" is already a verb meaning to leave suddenly: He bolted out of the room when he saw my mother coming up the driveway.
    "Blood" used to be African-American slang for an African-American, especially a man; an older version of "homeboy" or "homie." That's where "What up, blood?" comes from, and it originated quite a bit closer to the city center than suburbia.

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    The Bloods surely took their name from that, since the Bloods started out as an African-American street gang.

    It might be derived from the word's use in old British slang for an adventurous young man.

    Remember the South Park episode when Jimmy joined the Crips because he assumed they were all cripples?
     

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