"Fantabulous"

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by Saint, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Is there a word Fantabulous ?
    Fantastic + Fabulous ?

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  3. Zarklephaser Registered Senior Member

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    If you have nothing intelligent to say, then why say anything at all?
     
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  5. draqon Banned Banned

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    yo why u gotta be dissin people?
     
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  7. coffee_demon Registered Member

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    I don't think Fantabulous is a real word by any current dictionary standards, but I have heard it used before, kinda like Ginormous(Gigantic + Enormous) and Huge-tactular(huge + spectactular).
    Royal Canadian Air Farce, a canadian Satire show used "Fantabulous" in one of their skits making fun of the british accent girl from the show Daily planet. So yeah, I guess Fantabulous is a perfectly Cromulent word, but not yet a real one.
     
  8. stretched a junkie's broken promise Valued Senior Member

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    It`s not a regular word Saint, but we use it here to describe some kind of wonderful.
     
  9. tablariddim forexU2 Valued Senior Member

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    People are continually making up new words and once they become popular enough they are entered into the official dictionaries. Fantabulous is actually a proper word now.

    fantabulous
    /fantabyoolss/

    • adjective informal excellent; wonderful.

    — ORIGIN blend of FANTASTIC and FABULOUS.

    Oxford Dictionary
     
  10. stretched a junkie's broken promise Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah? Thanks Tab. I love English.
     
  11. Carcano Valued Senior Member

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    I like Splendiferous!
     
  12. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I first heard the word around 1958 on a TV quiz show called "The $64,000 Question." A precocious, nerdy, and rather arrogant boy about 14 years old named Robert Strom (sheesh, the things your brain remembers) was cleaning up, answering all the history questions, doing the math problems on a huge whiteboard, and explaining the principles of nuclear physics. He called the experience "fantabulous" and the next day America was using the word.

    Of course we now know the big secret that the contest was rigged. It's implausible that he could know that much about absolutely everything and not already be famous--and in graduate school. We were so naive and innocent back in those days, that thought never occurred to us. We wanted to believe and be enchanted by this pushy little genius.

    It doesn't mean that he couldn't have coined the word, there was a lot of that going on in the late 1950s. New slang was popping up every day, somebody had to be inventing it. Or it could have been scripted and invented for him by one of the show's writers.

    Or it could be an older word that had fallen out of favor and he or somebody else rediscovered it. Slang was never captured as dutifully in print as it has been since the 1960s. Historians and journalists, even novelists and lexicographers were a little dismissive of it. So a contemporary word origin sleuth would have a difficult time tracking it down if it's much older than Robert Strom's utterance on TV.
     
  13. dsdsds Valued Senior Member

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    1,678
    Holy crap? You remember the name of contestant on a tv show 50 years ago? And it just so happens that that contestant coined the word "fantabulous"? Again, Holy Crap! I can hardly remember my grandmother's name.
     
  14. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    is there a word FUCKER ?
     
  15. Theoryofrelativity Banned Banned

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    Urban Dictionary should provce an amusing resource for you


    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=fantabulous

    "Fantabulous 60 up, 9 down

    Sort of like "fabulous" but much more fabulous than the word "fabulous" can convey. Like supercalifragilisticexpialidocius but shorter and easier to spell.


    While on a free trip to Italy I won a free titanium frame bicycle and the customs agent let me bring it on the plane for free. What a Fantabulous trip!"

    "fucker 194 up, 35 down

    one who is rude, obnoxious, or mean....synonomous with Asshole, Dickhead,ect.

    90% of the human race is a bunch of fuckers"

    "splendiferous 13 thumbs up

    (adj) extremely delightful.

    {this is actually a word, look it up at Dictionary.com}

    Those cookies are splendiferous"
     
  16. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    The concept of what is a "real word" in English is rather vague. There is no equivalent of the French or Spanish Academy with authority to allow or disallow the addition of new words to the "offical" dictionaries, and in fact there is no "offical" English dictionary. There's not even an informal national consensus throttling back the acceptance of neologisms like there is in Germany. And there's no natural structural impediment to the creation of new words like the Chinese language has.

    In English, if you create a new word, you can get folks to understand it, and they decide to use it too, it's on its way to becoming part of the language. That's how everything from "ain't" and "laser" to "reggae" and "user-friendly" got here.
     
  17. Theoryofrelativity Banned Banned

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    The comment 'this is a real word' was not mine it was within the quotation marks and hence came from the urban dictionary.
     
  18. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

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    Irony is people who talk to themselves and then don't listen.
     
  19. Zarklephaser Registered Senior Member

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    So what exactly is your point?
     
  20. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I understand. I know what you meant. I was just making the point that in the English language, dictionaries don't have any real authority. It's a democratic language, we decide what's in and what's out.
     
  21. Neo-Nuttyfish Registered Member

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    15
    If everyone said intelligent things all the time, then the world would be pretty boring. Me And Dudish Dude, for example, would have nothing to say...ever...and that really would suck, for us anyway. Everyone else wouldn't be too bothered by it all. Also, we wouldn't have rap/pop/hip-hop music (wahey), which might upset some people, who wouldn't be able to say how they felt so they would resort to violence, leading to riots and the eventual end of the world as we know it...or something.
     
  22. Zarklephaser Registered Senior Member

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    186
    No, I understand your point. I was trying to say that this is pretty much a pointless post. I am all for unintelligent comments.
     
  23. valich Registered Senior Member

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    Unlike Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic, Mayan, Astec, and other character-based languages, English is an alphabetic language with 26 symbols that denote the phonetics that can be transcribed into seperate individual phonemes with endless combinations. These English "phonemes" are transcribed and articulated into seperate segments of what we call a "word." Very often a word has evolved into a "suprasegmental symbol" and we can often understand the meaning of each individual seperate single segment. When this happens, as in the case of the above two words, "fantastic" and "fabulous," then we are very easily able to combine the individual seperate phonetically transcribed segments of the word and retranscribe them into a new word.

    This is the richness of the English language, and many other Anglo-Saxon languages, especially German. Currently, the longest combined suprasegmental word is the German word: "Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz" and is a word used to "express a law having to do with British beef (Rindfleisch) and the so-called "mad cow disease.""
    see: http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa010300a.htm

    In fact, English is a West Germanic language (Anglo-Saxon) and both are originally based on the Latin alphabet which can be traced back to ancient Sanskrit.
     

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