Excuse me ,did anybody actually attempt to freeze and defrost a person ...

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by Truenemo1889, Jan 19, 2002.

  1. Truenemo1889 Registered Senior Member

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    over along period of time ? Wouldn't it be good to know if the cryogenic suspension method actually really worked ? I heard that even if an absolutely healthy person were to be frozen quickly , his/her changes of getting up after the defrosting process wouldn't be that great .


    Can anyobody give me a hint ???

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  3. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    From what I know, it's still not possible to freeze and defrost a person with Cryogenics.

    I know that smaller organisms like worms could be frozen and then thawed, but it was purely due to their size. The problem with freezing cellular structures is the speed that is necessary to limit cellular damage. When water freezes it expands, and at a molecular level the same can occur to the human body, this means that ice crystals actually damage the cell structures.

    This is noticible if you've ever seen any pictures of people with severe frost bit, where the cells are damaged the bloodvessels burst and their fingers/nose/limbs go Black (the deepest darkest clotted stagnant blood) and usually results in amputation.

    Another way of explaining of this cellular damage is to place something like a strawberry in a freezer. Normally the strawberry is solid enough to handle, but if you freeze it then thaw it, you will find that it's cellular structure has been damaged to make it weep liquid and squish at the touch. (And if it was human I'm sure it would shiver).

    I would say that it's not Commercially viable to use Cryogenics, but there are bound to be a few "Frozen" guinea pigs. I actually remember many tales about the Headless Torso's being frozen seperately from their Decapitated heads, But I have no colaberating evidence for that "rumour".
     
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  5. odin Registered Senior Member

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    cryogenic suspension

    Try growing a frozen pea,it will never grow!

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  7. Truenemo1889 Registered Senior Member

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    Thank you , Stryderunknown and Odin ...

    for your replies - I guess the people who let themselves be cryogenically suspended just wasted their money . It seems it is going to take a while until sciense can catch up with science-fiction .

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  8. Markx Registered Senior Member

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    Re: Thank you , Stryderunknown and Odin ...

    There is only one person who knows how to do it.

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    Dr. Evil

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  9. Boris2 Valued Senior Member

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    Keep your options open

    The people who got themselves frozen, hopefully to be revived at a later date, argue that if it doesn't work they have just done their money. If it works then they live again.

    Whereas the people that don't get frozen are forever dead with no hope of revival.
     
  10. goofyfish Analog By Birth, Digital By Design Valued Senior Member

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    A related article from Nature.com regarding the successful transplanting of a frozen/thawed organ seems to support this also.

    Peace.
     
  11. Adam §Þ@ç€ MØnk€¥ Registered Senior Member

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    When you freeze cells they crack, get damaged. When you thaw them they're stuffed. However, I saw on the news a few months ago someone had developed something to prevent the cracking/damage. I have no idea where to start looking for it on the net, sorry.
     
  12. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    It's all very well freezing one Mass of the same matter, but when your talking about an organism of a quantum entangled structure and multiple differing absolute 0's for different elements, then you start realising just how Difficult and Improbable it is to be able to freeze and unthaw a human.
     
  13. Ana Registered Senior Member

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    I have the PERFECT SOLUTION

    We could disassemble the person and freeze individual parts and then put 'em together like Frankenstein's monster.....hehehe

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    However, the people putting me back together better get their stitching straight....or maybe by then...laser....or something even better!

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    Anyone tried to preserve a human brain and implant it in a new person yet?
     
  14. bbcboy Recovering christian Registered Senior Member

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    Working as a nurse, we actually use a treatment called cryotherapy to destroy tissue. Mainly for things like warts or skin tumours.
    Liquid nitrogen is the element of choice and as I've suggested it's main attraction in this case is the destruction of tissue.

    That said, If I had more money than prognosis, what the hey?

    Chill !!

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  15. kmguru Staff Member

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  16. kmguru Staff Member

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    FYI...

    VALIDATION OF AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR FREEZING HUMAN HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS IN CASES WHERE A PROGRAMMABLE FREEZER IS NOT AVAILABLE. G. Cameron, C. Robertson, H. Nakamoto, M. Taller, S. Abraham, C. Eaves. Terry Fox Laboratory, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

    Cryopreservation of primitive hematopoietic cells is a critical part of most autologous transplant procedures. Much effort over the last 3 decades has led to the identification of conditions that allow a high recovery after thawing of viable primitive cells. The standard procedure in use at our centre involves first adding an equal volume of sterile 20% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in PlasmaLyte A® to the cell suspension and then immediately transferring the cells to a Kryo 10 controlled rate freezer preprogrammed to decrease the temperature 1°C/minute to -60°C and then 5°C/minute to -90°C. The cells are then placed directly in a liquid nitrogen freezer. Upon rapid thawing, patients’ cells frozen according to this procedure show a viability of 92±7% (n=151) as assessed in colony-forming cell (CFC) assays (for CFU-GM, BFU-E and CFU-GEMM). To evaluate an alternative freezing strategy in case of failure of the Kryo 10 freezer, the following study was undertaken. Parallel test vials of cells from patients’ bone marrow (n=3) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=2) in the final DMSO solution were placed in a Styrofoam container in a -86°C freezer for a minimum of 2 hours. These vials were then transferred to the same liquid nitrogen freezer as the control vials frozen using the Kryo 10 freezer. CFC and 6-week long term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays were then performed on the test and control cells thawed simultaneously. CFC and LTC-IC values in the test-frozen vials were 94±11% and 138±62% of control values. These findings suggest that the alternative method described here is suitable for freezing progenitor cells for use in clinical protocols.
     

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