Evolution and Oedipus.

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by TheFrogger, May 5, 2017.

  1. TheFrogger Registered Senior Member

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    Hello, and welcome.

    Is there an evolutionary advantage to an Oedipus complex?

    IF we are simply animals then a sleeping creature is most at danger when asleep. As such if evolution is true, will we not evolve into creatures that do not sleep.

    Sharks must keep moving to remain alive and as such each half of their brain sleeps, while the other half keeps them in motion. Like riding a bike! Stop moving and you must put your foot down, leaving a print.
     
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  5. TheFrogger Registered Senior Member

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    A desire for the opposite sex? Do any females have anything to comment on the Elektra complex??
     
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  7. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    That is not what the Oedipus Complex is.

    The desire for the opposite sex is simply called heterosexuality.

    I provided a link.

    And I don't see what it has to do with sleeping and sharks.
     
  8. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    Nope, that is not what the Oedipus complex is about.

    What do you think that means?

    What do you think the Oedipus complex has to do with sleeping? Is this just some sort of stream of consciousness thread?

    Edit to add, looks like you have the same questions and comments Dave.
     
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Don't be a nitwit. You might as well argue that it is an evolutionary advantage for an organism not to need food, so why do they all still need food?

    In any organism, there are trade-offs to be made.

    Obviously.
     
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  10. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    Oedipus was a mythical man who married his mother & killed his father. He did not know they were his parents.

    This & other variations of incest are not genetically harmful in the absence of recessive genes for some mental or physical problem.

    Many folks consider incest to guarantee harmful genetic consequences.

    In actual fact, the consequence of incest is increased probability of the offspring exhibiting some recessive trait.

    If there are no undesirable recessive traits, there are no harmful consequences. ​

    Cleopatra, for example, was the result of several generalizations of brother/sister marriages. History indicates that she was both mentally & physically healthy.

    If one or both parents of siblings are mentally or physically superior, their offspring are likely to be better than the offspring of ordinary parents.
     
  11. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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  12. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    Perhaps some "Morpheus inclination" was meant instead? The dreams of sleep might ironically be what the brain uses to stay at operational readiness in case of a threat, via having an oneiric avatar still actively wandering about in a simulated reality. Sounds from the external environment occasionally filter into dreams, too, as potential alerts.

    The eyes of our nearest ancestors didn't feature the tapetum lucidum anymore than us, so there was a measure of danger (from accident and predators) in stumbling around through the wilderness at night. It thus made developmental sense to just find a safe nook to hole-up in during that unproductive period. (As if the capacity to descend into deep tranquility wasn't already long since installed in prior animal generations).
     
  13. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Not true. A sleeping animal doesn't move or make sound, and it stays in a safe place. Animals are safest when asleep.
     
  14. TheFrogger Registered Senior Member

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    Excellent argument Spidergoat. But what of snoring??
     
  15. river

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    Animals are safest when asleep ?

    What of scent ?
     
  16. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    They also hide in a hole or burrow.
     
  17. river

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    Snakes and lizards can get into holes and burrows , by scent .
     
  18. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, those are a danger, but in general my statement stands. It's hard for a snake to "see" the heat of an animal underground.
     
  19. river

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    How do you know what a snake can , see ?

    What if scent is like a bat sonic waves ?
     
  20. H.sapiens Registered Member

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    There is an evolutionary advantage to anything that makes it more probable that an individual's genome will be passed on to later generations. Thus ... you are asking the wrong question.

    Sleep is an advantage. A predator will eat a prey species awake or asleep, being hidden and still during the more dangerous night can be an evolutionary advantage. There is also to issue of cats who are such efficient predators that, if they did no sleep in excess of 20 hours per day, they would eliminate their food supply.

    Sharks do not sleep half their brain at a a time, dolphins and whales do. Sharks sleep their entire brain, but can "sleep swim."

    You really should look things up prior to posting, that would prevent both your appearing ignorant as well as spreading rank foolishness.
     

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