ERVs in genomes are not from viruses.

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by Zeno, Oct 18, 2017.

  1. Kittamaru Now nearly 40 pounds lighter. Staff Member

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    Given that Zeno doesn't seem to have any interest in arguing actual facts or anything even close to reality... I think my best advice at this point is:

    Don't feed the troll
     
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  3. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Evolution. If they happen to help the species survive they will be passed on.
    Indicates evolution to me.
    Close, so close. They did not 'evolve', but if the ERVs happened to be beneficial or neutral they will be passed on.

    Simple. No magic required!
     
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  5. Zeno Registered Senior Member

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  7. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Now you got it!
    No, the ERVs did not evolve, as I just said in the previous post. ERVs, like a mutation, can be beneficial, detrimental or neutral. If they are beneficial or neutral then they will be passed on.
     
  8. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    The probability that ANY given mutation can happen by random chance is very, very small.

    ERV's are detrimental to the organism. Therefore the organism will not keep such mutations. Thus the only way for them to show up in the genome is via a delivery mechanism from outside (like a retrovirus.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2017
  9. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    4,659
    I wouldn't call it 'prove'. More like 'suggests'.

    I don't believe that evolution is a fairy-tale, so I don't dismiss it. I think that it's probably the likeliest explanation.

    One needn't assume that humans and apes were "created separately". Even if humans and apes are different branches on the same phylogenetic tree, they might have been separately infected by similar retroviruses. There may be some other explanation for why the ERVs end up in similar locations on chromosomes. Perhaps those that ended up elsewhere had harmful effects that led to those individuals dying or failing to reproduce. Perhaps that particular location on a chromosome had some advantageous effect. Perhaps that particular location simply made it easy for the cell to inhibit virus replication and hence to prevent the cell from being lysed, releasing countless more virus particles. Chromosomes are exceedingly complicated things, with all kinds of molecular switches turning genes on and off.

    I don't think so.
     
  10. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    He seemingly represents somebody trying to craft a scientific argument for "creation science". At the very least, his doing that gives board readers the opportunity to learn more about endogenous retroviruses and about what their evolutionary significance might be.

    I think that he represents a learning opportunity for everyone, if anyone on Sciforums is smart enough to grasp it.
     
  11. Jake Arave Icthyologist/Ethologist Registered Senior Member

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    145
    I couldn't disagree more really, there's no point in even acknowledging these people. Take it as an opportunity to learn more of HERVs - sure, but religious fanatics will never learn.
     

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