english grammar

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by NightFall, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. NightFall Lazy Hedonist Valued Senior Member

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    please help me find this answer before i tear my hair out...

    what is it called the when the beginning sound of a word repeats itself in a phrase or sentance? for example:

    Tommy took two tulips to timmy's on tuesday.


    this is driving my crazy.. i thought it was called an assination.. but that turns out not to be a word.. soooo....
    i figured i would be best to ask you all, since you are all such a brilliant bunch.. well.. some of you are anyway =)
     
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  3. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Assination is what Snakelord does.
     
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  5. przyk squishy Valued Senior Member

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    Alliteration (I don't know if there's a more specific term if the repeated sound is at the beginning of the word).
    There's also "assonance", if the sound is a vowel.
     
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  7. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Yeah, it's alliteration.
     
  8. NightFall Lazy Hedonist Valued Senior Member

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    i love you. thank you.
     
  9. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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  10. NightFall Lazy Hedonist Valued Senior Member

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    so then...

    if consanant = alliteration..

    and a vowel = assonance..

    then...

    "Thomas took Oliver's oval oranges twice on tuesday" = Assonation? HEHHEHEEHHEHE
     

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