Enamel building on tooth

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Syzygys, Jul 12, 2012.

  1. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    Lots of people grinds their teeth while sleeping, wearing away the enamel protecting it. Now there is a toothpaste with enamel in it that supposed to help to build up the wore off enamel. I use it and I think it kind of works, but...
    Here is what I don't get. Assuming a 2 minutes toothbrushing twice a day, that means the chemical touches the tooth for 4 minutes or less a day, and since the mouth is rinsed afterward, it is usually completely removed. So how does a 4 minutes a day connection can make and build the hardest part of our body?? It just doesn't make sense to me. If it was something that we keep in our mouth overnight covering the teeth, I could buy it, but with these rinsing away the good stuff almost immediately, I just don't see how it can work...

    Any explanation or personal story? As I said, I use it and I think it works, I just don't understand it. Unless the paste bonds with the tooth very quickly...
     
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  3. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

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    There could be an anaesthetic in such toothpastes - which is why they seem to work.
     
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  5. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    I don't see what anaesthetic has to do with enamel, unless you are implying the painkiller effect...

    Anyhow, after googling the problem, it seems they are lying, and nothing really builds enamel, just like I thought:

    "A CVS store brand promises it "helps harden tooth enamel with acid protection formula.
    The claims are often based on the presence of fluoride, which scientists say combines with minerals in your mouth to create a crystal called fluorapatite on the surface of your teeth. Some of the toothpastes, including Crest's Enamel Shield, Sensodyne ProNamel and Squigle Inc.'s Enamel Saver, are also formulated to be less abrasive to protect your enamel from rubbing off when brushing. "

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704141104575588374178767514.html

    Verdict: it is acid resistancy, not enamel building

    "Scientists give mixed reviews to the claims. They say it is incorrect to say a toothpaste can strengthen enamel as it doesn't make teeth physically stronger against shearing forces—such as biting into a piece of popcorn."

    Bottomline: "The enamel-strengthening claims on the label are "a marketing gimmick,"
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
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  7. arauca Banned Banned

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    If this is the case buy yourself a box of Bicarbonate and brush your teeth 2 minute / day twice a day see if you get the same effect
     
  8. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    What it has to do with anything? I don't have a problem with the enamel building paste as long as it helps in some way and don't falsely advertise...
     
  9. arauca Banned Banned

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    Advertizement don't belong in chemistry, do they, I stuck my 5 cents because it was mentioned " acid protection"
     
  10. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

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    The typical commercial for such toothpastes here goes like this: A test person is found who has sensitive teeth and who doesn't want to eat anything hot or cold or sweet, because it would hurt. Then they are given the "enamel-rebuilding toothpaste" that supposedly helps against the problem with sensitive teeth. Then they rub the paste onto their teeth with their fingers. Then they are given an ice-cold beverage, or a hot one, or something very sweet. Then the test person is all cheerful and "Oh, it works!"

    Only an anaesthetic can have that kind of effect.
     
  11. darksidZz Valued Senior Member

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    4,920
    Huh? Sensitive teeth are caused by gums being receded not tooth decay, that's a cavity and a dentist fixes it :/ wth?

    Anyways I've done some research on this and there is a treatment for receding gums that eliminates all surgical routes, it's pretty simple

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/07/23/us-receding-gums-idUSTRE56M4LB20090723

    But dentists probably won't know about it yet and will look at you as if you're crazy for mentioning it, my dentist is still pressuring me to remove my wisdom teeth even after I had their recommended graft thing to uncover the gum, stupid dentists....... anyhow

    So yes this treatment should be available in 10 years (slow to adopt new things) and nobody will need skin grafts on gums bla bla and gum disease will be rather meaningless then, but....

    I saw a thing on mice regrowing teeth through gene manipulation and I think it's going to be easy to give humans a pill in 10 years that basically reboots their tooth regrowth cycle from childhood, and if you break a tooth, well? just regrow one with a pill instead!
     
  12. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    12,671
    Actually both. My dentist told me if the enamel wears off more on the back of my front teeth, I have to have a crown on them. So yes, thin or missing enamel also causes sensitivity.

    I also heard about some new technic, but if it makes less dental business, they will be slow to adopt it...
     
  13. darksidZz Valued Senior Member

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    The method of regeneration for gums I mentioned would have large reprecussions for the industry as a whole, which is why I'm surprised anyone was allowed to research it in the first place. Hopefully in 10 years when I no longer have gums this will be as easy as going in for 30 mins and then leaving, paying 400 for a entire mouth lol
     
  14. WangLP Registered Member

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    Ok ,you are right.
     
  15. elte Valued Senior Member

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    Maybe try ways to leave toothpaste on your teeth as much as possible between meals. What I try to do after brushing my teeth after meals is try not to let rinse water after brushing get on my top set of teeth.
     
  16. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Virtually 100% of the population have their wisdom teeth removed. The most common reason is that our jaw isn't quite big enough to hold 32 teeth, so their presence slowly pushes on the other teeth, knocking them out of alignment so they don't mate properly, giving you a poor bite. Another is that it's at least very difficult and sometimes impossible for people to properly brush and floss the rear edge of their wisdom teeth, because there's no room to work there, so they end up with cavities that are just as difficult for the dentist to fill as it was for them to brush. It's also quite common for the wisdom teeth themselves to come in slightly crooked (for the same reason: not enough space), which again gives you a poor bite and may also leave odd-shaped gaps that are hard to brush, proxybrush and floss.

    If you don't trust your dentist to be honest, and assume that he wants to perform oral surgery on you just to increase his bank balance, then you need to find a new dentist with whom you can establish a better relationship. I don't know about you, but I don't want somebody fiddling around with my body and its various components whom I don't trust!

    Besides, if you don't have your wisdom teeth removed, the issues that I listed above will very probably result in a lot of work for the dentist, as the wisdom teeth keep pushing on everything else and rearranging your mouth into a slightly different configuration every year. So in the long run he'd make more money off of you.
     
  17. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    12,671
    Where the hell do you dream up numbers like that? First, it depends on the country, second, it depends on money. I would say even if we are talking Western countries it is only like 30% or less. And even dentists debate the issue, some of them saying that about 2/3rd of the removals are unnecessary...
     
  18. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    I don't know how usefult his is, but...

    According to Wikipedia most peoples wisdom teeth erupt between the ages of 17 and 24.
    According to this source citing a 2007 study, 10,000,000 Americans get their wisdom teeth removed each year, 2/3rds of which are unnecessary.
    According to the United States Census Bureau there are 39 million Americans in that age category.
    Assuming that most people that get their wisdom teeth removed fall into this age bracket, that equates to a 25.6% chance of an individual having their wisdom teeth removed in a given year.
    Assuming I've done my maths correctly, this in turn indicates an approximately 7% chance of an individual NOT having their wisdom teeth removed during this period (74.3% chance of it not happening, and it needs to not happen nine times in a row), which suggests that approximately 93% of 26 year old Americans have had their wisdom teeth removed.

    I've worded it like that, because obviously the percentage is going to vary dependent on which cohort you examine and how long the propylactic removal of wisdom teeth has been practiced.
     
  19. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    Well, your basic assumption is that the 10 million surgeries refers to that particular age group. There is no evidence that they couldn't remove wisdom teeth for 40 years old people. But OK, it is probably more likely that an average removal candidate is in that age group.

    By the way I would approach the numbers problem this way: There are 311 Americans, about 3 million extra every year and 10 million removals. This is probably not enough data to determine the %, but that's how I would look at it...

    But let's throw away the statistics, and just look at the money issue. There are lots of poor Americans who simply can not afford the removal. I am just pulling out numbers, but I would say at least 1/4th can not afford it.

    Now about the necessity. It is just like braces, a fashion fad, not to mention good business. Our kid got one although I don't think he needed, but whatever...And his wisdom tooth got removed too, because let's not mess with the expensive braces! So had there been no braces, probably wisdom tooth pull wouldn't have been either...

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    The dental industry is just pushing for it, because it gets them more profits...
     
  20. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Which was explicitly stated.

    I considered that possibility, but went with the assumption that I did, based on the assumption that most people would have their wisdom teeth removed when the first emerged, rather than waiting 17 years and then doing so. Additionally it simplified the calculation to one that could essentially be performed on the back of an envelope to give a ball-park figure.

    That was the way I looked at it, hence the language I used.

    I considered that approach, along with one or two others.
    I had all three of mine removed under a general anesthetic. Two were horizontaly impacted, one was vertically impacted, and they were causing me problems.
     
  21. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    One thing we didn't account for: I never got any of my wisdom tooth at all, so no removal was ever necessary. I am not sure what % never get wisdom tooth, but they obviously lower the number of surgeries...

    No numbers in this article, but mentions the over usage of removal for no good reasons (except making profits):

    http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20050505/wisdom-teeth-removal-often-unnecessary

    Going back to the original topic, my toothpaste saw "Enamel saver" thus it doesn't claim it builds it up...
     
  22. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    10,890
    That was one of the reasibs I took the approach that I did - with the approach I took, you don't actually need

    I'm unsurprised.
     
  23. elte Valued Senior Member

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    1,253
    Another thing I do is instead of applying the full amount of toothpastee at the beginning of brushing, I add a thin line of paste onto the brush and then begin on one surface of the upper left side. I do this for all six sides of the top teeth to prevent a blob of toothpaste from falling down to the lower mouth where it doesn't help much. I don't have to add any new paste when I begin on the lower teeth. Once I do the lower teeth once, I go and redo the top but don't need to add any more paste. After the top is done twice, I finish by doing the bottom again. (I only add toothpast 6 times during the first round of top brushing.)

    I often floss between most of the top teeth after the first round of brushing both top and bottom. Then I do the second round of brushing for both top and bottom.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2012

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