Electron bonds

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by trevor borocz johnson, Nov 25, 2022.

  1. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    The electron doesn't bond I think. They repel against the attraction of the nuclei's gravity. The heat that makes the electron seeks out colder regions of space/aether whatever you call it to expand into as it is free of the source it originated from. This quality of energy heat to be attracted to the cold causes the repulsion, neither electron is attracted to the heat of the other.
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,561
    Word salad.

    Take your meds, Trevor.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    So in electrostatic theory the proton is a sink and the electron an inward flow that attracts the electron to the proton? What keeps them from colliding?
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,442
    That's a high school level question. Have you considered getting some before expounding upon atomic theory?
     
  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,561
    Why doesn't the Earth collide with the Sun, due to the gravitational attraction between them?
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2022
  9. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    I don't know. Hey exchemist before I get the permanent boot here I just thought I'd mention to our lightning discussion that lightning has been seen and recorded on Jupiter as well, so maybe there is more to consider there.
     
  10. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    The atomic number of oxygen is eight, assuming that nuclei are round, 8 of them would create a perfect cube, this would make oxygen more stable in it's energy shells around the atom, and lack a common trait of atom's to be unstable in these regions and good conductors. Also iron is 26, one shy of a perfect 27 and is the densest strongest atom.

    Notice how magnetism is a property to cubic numbers of 3 and 4 give or take a couple nuclei. A perfect cubic structure might line up the atoms so they act together and create a fan like magnetic effect. Could that be a clue to the electric potential of water?

    "Magnetically hard materials are used to create permanent magnets made from alloys generally consisting of varying amounts of iron, aluminium, nickel, cobalt and rare earth elements samarium, dysprosium and neodymium."

    What Materials Make Magnets | First4Magnets
    https://www.first4magnets.com › magnetic-materials-i156






    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!




    d rare earth elements samarium, dysprosium and neodymium.
     
  11. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    If oxygen, which is a gas, has a strong magnetic field on its own, as strong as steel, but doesn't line up as easily because its a gas, that could explain why its so energy absorbing and exchanges energy readily during oxidation.
     
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,442
    Nope.
    There is no such thing as Oxygen-8 (which is what would be required to make your perfect cube).
    Oxygen-16 has 8 protons and 8 neutrons.
    Oxygen-17 has 8 protons and 9 neutrons.
    Oxygen-18 has 8 protons and 10 neutrons.

    Please stop talking about stuff you know nothing about. Your posts serve only to accelerate global warming and the eventual heat death of the universe.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2022
  13. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    20,864
    Oxygen can be a gas, a liquid or a solid (like most elements.)
     
  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,561
    There is actually one glimmer of sanity in Trevor's rambling, which is that the ground state of O₂ is a triplet,( ³Σ⁻g), with 2 unpaired electrons in π* orbitals. This gives oxygen a magnetic moment, making it paramagnetic, that is, tending to be attracted into an external field, as it can reduce its potential energy by aligning the molecules with the field. So while it makes no sense to describe it as magnetic, it can be "magnetised", in a sense.

    As with Beaconator, one has the sense that poor Trevor might have known some chemistry once, before the schizophrenia overwhelmed him.
     
  15. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    Well I tried a little experiment to see if the cubic nature of the Oxygen in water could be alligned and then frozen into place. I froze a magnet in water and it did NOT align the water molecules in any magnetic form. However water has two atoms of hydrogen, its not pure oxygen, maybe frozen oxygen would behave differently.
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,442
    Yes, but that was the given; we know oxygen is paramagnetic. Trevor maybe picked that up from Wiki and ran with it in his whimsical way.
     
  17. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    The nucleus of non cubic atoms would have an electron shell that varies, in its weak state where the nuclei are loosely together it would have a positive charge of donuts. In it's strong state the electron would be highly energized and compress the nucleus into a spherical shape as best it can. My point is these atoms would take on and lose electron energy readily as opposed to those that are closer to being cubic in formation. The more cubic nucleus's are more resilient to their original state, why steel is leading elastic material, they make springs out of it, unlike copper which would make a poor spring.
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,561
    He might, I suppose. It's the sort of thing a magnetism crank (and God knows, there are plenty of them about

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    ) might latch onto.

    Oh well, I suppose we've got better things to do than try to guess the mental processes of somebody mentally ill.
     
  19. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
  20. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    Actually I'm going to have to go back on something I said. Oxygen would have a weaker shell of electron energy because the nucleus is small and would therefore have a weak magnetic field. That might explain its weak paramagnetic effect. I wonder what would happen if you magnetized Oxygen as you froze it.

    But the cubic numbers of 8, 27, and 64 have neighboring atoms that are all close to the same density and electronegativity within there respective groups.
     
  21. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    398
    Electronegativity is the only quality where the groupings of 8,27,64 and there neighboring numbers line up in the chart without overlapping each other. 7,8 and 9 are strongest then the grouping 26,27,28,and 29 are midly electronegative, and the group around 64 are least electronegative.

    The three cubic groups also are in close range for melting and boiling points as well. https://www.lenntech.com/periodic-chart-elements/boiling-point.htm
     
  22. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    37,747
    That is wrong, which means that the reason you gave for thinking that must be wrong, too.
     
  23. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    37,747
    What chart?

    Explain what you're talking about.

    What are the numbers you're referring to?

    The point of posting here is to communicate something to other people, isn't it? Otherwise, why bother?
     

Share This Page