Electric cars are NOT a pipe dream. Fossil fuel cars are for greedy, selfish people.

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by cosmictotem, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    The economic collapse is slow, that's why we don't notice it that much. But people that are paying attention notice that parts of America are jobless, hopeless, and getting desperate enough for vote for anyone that seems like they have a solution, like Trump.
     
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  3. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    So slow, in fact, that it is collapsing backwards!

    Funny Rodney Dangerfield one-liner: "If I felt any better, I'd go to the hospital!"
     
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  5. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    What country are you talking about?
     
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  7. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    USA.
     
  8. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    The middle class is imploding if you haven't noticed.
     
  9. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    Imploding upwards!
    [Edit]
    Rather than just continuing a meaningless tit-for-tat, why don't you just tell me, exactly what you meant by "imploding". What specific stat or stats measure it?
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2016
  10. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    "The aggregate US economy may be growing but most people’s personal economies are not. Census Bureau data show that real per capita income is still below 2007 levels—despite six years of solid economic growth. And Bureau of Labor Statistics data show that despite today’s low unemployment rates the jobs still haven’t come back.

    Back in 2006 the employment rate of the civilian population—the proportion of adults who had jobs—was over 63 percent. Allowing for people who are still in school, people who are retired, people who are disabled, and people who prefer not to work, that was just about everyone. When the economy is doing well, people who want jobs can get jobs.

    Compare that with 2015. For all of 2015 to date the employment rate has been stuck below 60 percent. In fact, the employment rate has been not risen above 60 percent since the technical beginning of the “recovery” in June, 2009. Over the last six years, the economy has recovered. Employment has not.

    The difference between the 63 percent employment rate of 2006 and the (well under) 60 percent employment rate of 2015 is roughly 7.5 million people. That’s the number of jobs missing in today’s roaring economy. Bringing today’s employment rate back up to 2006 levels would require the creation of more than 7.5 million new jobs.

    What’s more, since the Global Financial Crisis there has been a shift from full-time to part-time employment. Some 2.5 million full-time jobs have disappeared, to be replaced by part-time employment. Assuming that people have basically the same preferences as they had before the recession hit, this means that the US economy is really short 10 million full-time jobs...

    ...What we see today is a US economy that is great for banks, great for bankers, and not so great for ordinary workers. Employment rates are down, employment hours are down, and wages are down. Bank profits are up, up, up to record levels. It’s no wonder that ordinary people are not as optimistic as the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System."

    http://pressblog.uchicago.edu/2016/01/19/if-the-us-economy-is-so-good-why-does-it-feel-so-bad.html
     
  11. Russ_Watters Not a Trump supporter... Valued Senior Member

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    Nowhere in there does it say anything about a decline/collapse or even mention the middle class! So it doesn't have anything to do with your previous claims!

    All it really says is that we dug a big hole in 2008-2009 and aren't completely out of it yet. It even says several times that the economy is improving (and several more in the section you cut before what you quoted). It does contain one misrepresentation though: the employment rate. There's a very good reason why the employment rate is down even as the unemployment rate is also down: Baby Boomers are retiring.

    Anyway, your "middle class is imploding" quote: since you won't say what you mean, I'll have to guess. And I'm pretty sure I know: article after article and politician after [liberal] politician point out that under certain definitions, the middle class is getting smaller. Tragedy! Trouble is, if you read the fine print, the middle class is getting smaller mostly because people are moving up out of the middle class and into the upper class! It's a particular favorite topic for CNN:
    http://money.cnn.com/2016/05/11/news/economy/middle-class-shrinking/
    http://money.cnn.com/2015/12/09/news/economy/middle-class/
     

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