Downwind faster than the wind

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by billvon, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. A.T. Registered Member

    Messages:
    73
    J/s = N*m/s
     
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  3. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    You still did not give me understanding. How do you get VELOCITY from that?

    Is lifting 50 lbs 10 feet not the same work as lifting 10 lbs 50 feet? If the work is the same and the time is the same at 3 seconds, then the power is the same, but the velocity is not the same.

    Power=Work/Time
    Power=(50*10)/3
    Power=(500)/3=166.66 work per second=.303HP
    Velocity=feet/second=3.33 ft/s


    Power=Work/Time
    Power=(10*50)/3
    Power=(500)/3=166.66 work per second=.303HP
    Velocity=feet/second=16.66 ft/s
     
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  5. A.T. Registered Member

    Messages:
    73
    m/s is a unit of velocity

    Yes

    Yes

    And neither is force
     
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  7. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    You claim power=force*velocity.

    I lifted a 29 lb object at a velocity of 16 ft/s. How much work was done?
     
  8. A.T. Registered Member

    Messages:
    73
    That's a formula for power, not for work.
     
  9. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    Work per second is power. 550 ft-lbs of work per second is equal to 1 HP.

    You claimed Power=Force*Velocity, so I gave you the force and velocity, and you did not tell me the power. Why not? Is it because you don't know the work, the distance, or the time?? (rolls eyes)
     
  10. A.T. Registered Member

    Messages:
    73
    Because you didn't ask about power.
     
  11. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    550 ft-lbs of work per second=1 HP. You are the one claiming that power=force*velocity. I gave you the force and velocity. How much HP is that?
     
  12. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,152
    No. There is no weight at the center of the Earth and the offset 10' from center can't be calculated, since the errors in modeling the Earth as a perfect sphere are greater than the minuscule gravitational differential at that coordinate.

    To correctly pose the question you should ask me if you lift a weight of 100 N a distance of 10 m from the surface of the Earth whether it requires 1000 Joules, and the answer is yes. It's just not the conventional way of treating weight; we measure in in kg. So suppose you ask me how many Joules it takes to lift 100 kg a distance of 10 m from the surface of the Earth. In this case the answer is 9,800 J.

    Weight = mass x gravitational constant = 100 kg x 9.8 m/s[sup]2[/sup] = 980 kg-m/s[sup]2[/sup] = 980 N = Force

    Work = Force x distance = weight x distance = 980 N x 10 m = 9,800 J
     
  13. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    I said I lift it away from the center of the earth, I didn't say it was at the center of the earth and then lifted away. If I lift a rock off the ground in a direction away from the center of the earth it doesn't mean that I lifted the rock from the center, it means I lifted the rock in a direction AWAY from the center of the earth. It's just like you to come up with some BS because your BS is just that, BS!
     
  14. KitemanSA Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    624
    Read post 53 or 55. Sheeze, dude!
     
  15. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    Read, and more importantly UNDERSTAND post #62, DUDE.
     
  16. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,152
    I just got here. I see your panties are pre-wadded for me. Has the wind machine guy been torquing your wrench?
     
  17. A.T. Registered Member

    Messages:
    73
    0.84hp
     
  18. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    How do you torque a wrench?

    Edit, If you just got here, then did someone hijack your account in post #53?
     
  19. KitemanSA Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    624
    Seems you answered yourself twice. POWER = force*velocity. Simple.
     
  20. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,152
    That's about all you can do with a wrench unless you're one of those guys that opens your beer with them.
     
  21. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    How much work was done? What distance was the object lifted? How much time did it take to lift the object that distance?
     
  22. Motor Daddy ☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼☼ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    I've seen people like you use a wrench as a hammer.
     
  23. Aqueous Id flat Earth skeptic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,152
    Edit, If you just got here, then did someone hijack your account in post #53?

    No, if they had they wouldn't have been so generous as me to lend you a helping hand with your physics questions. They would have been all over you like a 200 ft-lb torque wrench on a Coors Lite.

    What I meant was, I hadn't been here for hours, not in this current confusion over the definitions of energy, work and power. Yes , I was here during the prior confusion over that. Hopefully it's making some sense to you.
     

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