Does this cover it?

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by PaulJames, Apr 8, 2016.

  1. PaulJames Banned Banned

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    • This is pseudomathematics, not a reliable statement of logic founded on well-stated principles. It has no place here.
    Does the simple sum 10/1 equal every answer possible. Follow:

    10/1

    1=a tenth(0.1)
    10=ten times larger(100)

    =100/0.1

    =infinity/infinitely small.
     
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  3. river

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    Answer to what .....exactly.
     
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  5. rpenner Fully Wired Valued Senior Member

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    • 10/1 is not a sum, it's a quotient.
    • \(\frac{10}{1} \neq \frac{100}{0.1}\)
    • \(\frac{10}{1} \neq \frac{\infty}{ \infty^{-1} }\)
    Every claim you made was wrong. This is not an auspicious start. Why have you chosen to post here? Is there some specific reason?
     
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  7. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    Kinda reminds me of our previous... "pseudomathematician", Waiter_2001.
     
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  8. PaulJames Banned Banned

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    But one is a tenth of ten, hence 0.1

    So then 10 is a hundred times larger than 0.1

    So then 10/1 becomes

    100/0.1

    ...and so on:

    10*(10^infinity)/1/(10^infinity)
     
  9. rpenner Fully Wired Valued Senior Member

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    4,833
    1 = 0.1 × 10
    1 = 0.1 × 10 ⇒ 0.1 = 1 / 10
    1 = 0.1 × 10 ⇒ { 10 = 10 AND 1 = 0.1 × 10 } ⇒ { 10 = 10 AND 1 = 10 × 0.1 } ⇒ 10 = 100 × 0.1

    That does not follow.


    What you have demonstrated was \( x = ( 10 \, x ) \times 0.1 \) which holds for all numbers x as well as all vector spaces over the rational numbers.
     
  10. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    I agree.
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    One of things that's happening is that you are using ambiguous words with an indistinct mathematical meaning:
    "hence", "becomes", "and so on"

    In this example, you say the word, then freely interpret what it might mean mathematically:
    So then 10/1 becomes 100/0.1

    You know what you're trying to say, but it doesn't hold mathematically.
     
  12. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    3,950
    Infinity is 'nan'. 'not a number'

    If you are trying to use infinity as if it were a number, that is a problem because it is the easiest method for producing inconsistent numerical results.
     
  13. PaulJames Banned Banned

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    Okay. Thanks.
     

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