Cynicism

Discussion in 'General Philosophy' started by Bowser, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    In away I can relate to the above in that I find more value in the experience than I do in things, but I wouldn't expect others to take the same path.
     
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  3. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Unfortunately, you can't use the word in modern English conversation and expect anyone to understand what you mean.
    The term "cynic" has undergone several conversions over the last two thousand years, first to mean something like 'rebel, radical'; one who rejects
    the mores of his society, later to mean 'selfish, unconcerned'; then to mean 'ruthless, unscrupulous' and most recently as a synonym for 'negative; pessimistic or sardonic'.

    Similarly, my philosophy of choice has been so misrepresented as to make it unemployable in modern discussion.
    https://www.britannica.com/topic/Epicureanism
     
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  5. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    Epicureanism would probably have little meaning for most, whereas Cynic is a word that nearly everyone can pull a definition, even for a commoner such as myself. Had you not offered a link, I would have no idea what the word might mean.
     
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  7. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    One does sometimes hear the word 'epicure' in reference to fine dining, but all the rest has been lost, just as virtue and nature have been lost from cynic.
     
  8. Jamie Lee Registered Member

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    I like this way of thinking. It doesn't gel with what I think of with "cynicism". Living in a way that is natural for yourself has a way more positive connotation than the conventional definition for the word.
     

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