Curvature of Space may be wrong

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by RegP1, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. RegP1 Registered Member

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  3. Oystein Registered Senior Member

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    Common forum courtesy states that you paraphrase your "work" into several paragraphs . . . here.
     
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  5. rpenner Fully Wired Staff Member

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    The poster's principal complaints come from ignorance of astronomy.

    The poster assumes that the May 29, 1919 eclipse viewing and the September 21, 1922 eclipse viewing observed the same set of stars and that the differences of star positions could be influenced by the Earth's change in position of "2 AU."

    The geometrical effect of perspective is well-known in astronomy but the closest stars are more than 100,000 AU so the effect is negligible.

    The actual situation is that 1) the sun is not a fixed point, 2) the stars are further away than poster knows, 3) the stars behind the sun were different for the two eclipses, 4) calculations were made to correct for change in viewing position and angle and motion of the Earth, 5) this experiment was replicated with much more precision at later times 6) Einstein rings provide better examples than rare total eclipses.
     
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  7. The God Valued Senior Member

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    First the OP, what do you mean by curvature of space? I always thought and that's my primary grudge that it is the curvature of spacetime not that of space.
     
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  8. RegP1 Registered Member

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    Thank you for your time, interest and knowledge and for enlightening my ignorance. You have been a great help. Sorry for the omission of the word "time". Thanks.
     
  9. Oystein Registered Senior Member

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    Oh, I doubt if it has gone that far. You've a way to go yet . . . . .
     

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