Culture Icons... R.I.P

Discussion in 'Art & Culture' started by R1D2, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Cecil Taylor died on the 5th.
    He was 89 - that is good, that he lived to be old. Not all the great jazz lives are tragedies.
    I moved his piano a couple of times, when he came to town - he traveled with it, a Bosendorfer with the full extra octave. A ridiculous thing to haul around cross country, but they were new then and he couldn't count on the local supply. Great concerts, if you like intense free jazz - he'd hand the room that piano.

    Buell Neidlinger, Taylor's bassist for seven of his best years, died a couple of weeks ago. A classical cello prodigy, teenage nervous breakdown, picked up the bass and - eventually - the musical world of America. The good stuff, anyway. He owned a standup bass that had played on the very first performance of Handel's Messiah (King George III owned and played it) and on the recording of the Eagles's "Hotel California" (Buell owned and played it). He played with Bill Monroe, he played with the Los Angeles Chamber Symphony (principal bassist for years), he played with Frank Zappa, he played with Billie Holiday, he played with Thelonius Monk. He formed a bluegrass-based band that played Thelonius Monk standards. He recorded Schubert's "Trout" Quintet.

    I first knew the name from two of Leo Kottke's better albums, which he produced and arranged for and played cello on. (They were Leo's first after tendinitis forced a change of sound on a player who had always been focused on sound, and a rehab that lasted three years for a player who made his mark via virtuosity - the producer played a key role.)


     
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  3. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    Not quite new, but rare--and extremely expensive. Busoni commissioned the design of the 97 key Bosendorfer Imperial in the early days of the twentieth century, in order to accommodate certain arrangements of organ pieces for piano which required a fuller bottom end.

    Any idea when Taylor started using the Imperial? From what I can tell, he was using it almost exclusively by the '80s, but I can't place his earliest usage.
     
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  5. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Cool. Now I know who to blame.
    None. My encounters with the things began in the '80s, if memory serves - that was the first I'd run into Taylor, as well.
     
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  7. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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  8. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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  9. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Harlan Ellison died.

    A writer. I've heard him use "inveigled" in an interview.
    http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-harlan-ellison-20180628-story.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlan_Ellison
    The obituaries generally go light on Ellison's broader cultural influence - not just writing a well-known script for the original Star Trek but heavily contributing to the establishment of the main characters as we know them, by that script, for example. Not just combatively suing people he thought had robbed him, but using the suits to publicize the cause of paying writers in modern culture. "Pay the effing writer" came from Ellison.

    They also go light on his various political involvements - he marched in Selma with MLK, he maintained a policy of refusing to hold readings etc in States that had not passed the ERA, that kind of thing - and enthusiasms - he reviewed (professionally) jazz and related music, hung out with the musicians, and owned a famous collection of jazz vinyl (no word on what will happen to it).

    This interview is worth the time, partly because it's set up and edited so that the interviewer asks concise questions and then stays out of the way, and partly because the interviewer has a remarkable voice. Seriously - that voice you might think is a special effect for introduction is the man's voice, throughout.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2018
  10. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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  11. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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  12. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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  13. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

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