Conventional advice

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by birch, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. birch Valued Senior Member

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    The prevailing theme in society is trying to separate the baby from the bathwater which is as impossible as trying to get a camel through the eye of a needle.

    One of these is to 'identify' or isolate certain traits to get a better handle on them and deal with an issue. This in turn happens to naturally end in labels of whole individuals.

    Practically speaking, this is inconsequential because it's merely an identifier in order to tackle a situation.

    What i've noticed is unrealistic though is the notion that a "sociopath", or "psychopath", or "narcissist" etc is someone that can be identified or experienced as such by everyone. There is this assumption that they are somehow more rare than they really are.

    This is the real truth I"ve found out. Just about everyone is capable of any of the dirty tactics of a sociopath, psychopath and narcissist. The only difference is 1) the degree 2) who.

    The truth is every sociopath, psychopath and narcissist except for the very extreme spectrum where they target everyone and anyone indiscriminately, has their own social circle, family, friends and are no different really than anyone else. Society has a moral checkpoint in place to mitigate or combat socially damaging behavior by calling them out in an overall format while the victims often forget that they are not really 'unusual' and just you are an unfortunate victim of a situation, they could have normal relationships with others also of their choosing. People can't make it through the world without that. Victims tend to paint them unrealistically as if everyone in society will be against their perpetrator because they happen to be a victim of them when in reality they have their own family, friends and circle.

    The truth is taking the general population, it should be no surprise that this is common. these situations are very common because most people are like that and that is what is not acknowledged.

    Most people will be inclined to mistreat or take advantage of people that they 'can' or don't care for. When this occurs, that is a form of sociopathy. The only real solution to such scenarios is to leave such people because you will never win and there is no point because they simply do not care- for you- and you will only hurt yourself further by keeping the door open for further manipulation and exploitation from them. They will find those who are more compatible with them if you leave them.

    This idea that sociopaths, psychopaths and narcisissts are so unique and rare in the sense they are the boogeyman of society is unrealistic and everyone should be looking out for the sociopath who exploited you. even sociopaths can form relationships and have what is termed a normal life with another sociopath (more accurately: similar level or degree and method of sociopathy) and find friends likewise etc. this is normal. they are part of the fabric of society all along.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
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  3. birch Valued Senior Member

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    for instance, this is another unrealistic fallacy. he is not considering other factors and variables and the varied types of people out there. there is no set formula. a co-dependent can also be a narcissist just as well not be. i observed even in my own life how toxic the relationship was between the stepfather and mother and they were both narcissists and sociopaths who were co-dependent on eachother.

    what he is describing is only one type of scenario where a sociopath is involved with a non-sociopath.
     
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  5. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    That isn't true.
     
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  7. birch Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, it is. the only difference is the degree.
     
  8. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Most people are not "inclined" to mistreat anyone, or take advantage of anyone.

    Also: degree makes a qualitative difference - a large enough difference in degree can make a difference in kind.
    Sociopaths and psychopaths quite often have no "normal" relationships with anyone. And yes, this does damage them in some ways - but they very often get along just fine in most respects. An unusually high percentage of very successful businessmen are sociopathic, for example.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    It seems to me that Birch is making a sort of "Lord of the Flies" allegation about humanity, which you are contradicting.

    My instinct is that you are probably right, but can you provide any references in support of your contentions here?
     

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