Conductive glass for solar cell

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by crazybuoy, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. crazybuoy Registered Member

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    How to make conductive a sheet of glass (3ft x 4ft) at the same time as explained mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/nanolab/TiO2/index.html to make solar cell?
     
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  3. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    This is his link: http://www.mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/nanolab/TiO2/index.html
    It describes step of making solar cell at home, but postage stamp size, far from 3' by 4' perhaps that was his question? Many years ago, I made transparent conductors with Stanus Oxide (tin oxide) films from solutions and heating was part of procedure but I forget the details.
     
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  5. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    Whats a soar cell, is it a torture device?

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  7. yaracuy Banned Banned

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    I had the impression they use a coating of Stanus oxide on the windshield of airplanes .
     
  8. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Quite possible. As I recall the films I made were tough, scratch resistant, and you could get them down to a few ohms per square with not too much lose of light transmission.

    A 1000 ohm /square is very clear, again as I recall. A square window with 500v applied across that film would have RI^2 = 250W which even at air temp of -40 (C or F as they equal at that temp)* I would think remains ice free.

    * PS I sometimes use this fact to convert temperatures in my head. E.g. 50F is 90 above this point or 10 units of 9 or 10 units of 5 on C scale so 50F = 10C.
    I find this easier than working from the 32 & 0 freezing points. 59F = 15C as both are 11 units of their "equal blocks" above -40 etc. I don't know why they don't teach this in school. So much easier with built in understanding of why. Half an "equal block" still higher means 63.5F = 17.5C etc.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2011
  9. Nasor Valued Senior Member

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    You just mist an aqueous solution of tin chloride + a dopant like some sort of fluorine or antimony salt onto a hot slab of glass. Sadly, it's been too long for me to remember the temperature or ideal solution concentrations. I seem to recall that you had to get it hotter than an ordinary hot plate would get, though.
     
  10. Johnny_Pencilface Registered Member

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    Yeah. It involves quite high temperatures. I remember seeing it being done with a Bunsen burner, but that was a long time ago. If you can only achieve modest temperatures, you might want to look into making copper-based photovoltaic cells instead.
     
  11. veggiepatch Registered Senior Member

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    Stanus?? Try stannous or stannic.

    Nobody here with chemistry knowledge I've noticed.
     

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