chlorine in tap water

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by sculptor, Jan 16, 2018.

  1. zgmc Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    789
    Why don't you switch to "raw" water? All natural water. Can't go wrong there...
     
    gebobs likes this.
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Hey, no fair. Everyone gets to assign their own importance to their own matters.
    A small problem - if solvable with small effort - is still worth it. (wisdom otherwise known as 'low-hanging fruit').

    All the OP might have to do is vote, and he can solve this easily.
     
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  5. naturallygorg Registered Member

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    Yes, that's correct! The water needs to be filtered longer to effectively remove chlorine.
     
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  7. el es Registered Senior Member

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    I am on a well. I buy bottled water for tea, coffee, and lemonade. That costs 3 to 5 bucks a week.
    When one of the houses is sold, the well usually gets a one time treatment.
     
  8. gebobs Registered Member

    Messages:
    36
    I use tap water filtered through my refrigerator. I'm sure it doesn't get all the chloramine out of the water but I'm not going to worry about that. I don't like using bottled water. I consume enough plastic as it is. I'm trying to wean off that crap.
     
  9. gamelord Registered Senior Member

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    661
    Isn't there some sort of bacteria we can put in the water, that will kill the other bacteria?

    Maybe not yogurt, but something else? And make sure the bacteria is not too strong to where it can survive in a pond? Because we need mold as part of the ecosystem.

    Or some other chemical that is healthier than chlorine.
     
  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,202
    If it kills the bacteria in the water, it's gonna kill bacteria in your body. TANSTAAFL.

    Chlorine is currently the best way.
     
  11. gamelord Registered Senior Member

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    661
    Chloromine, you mean, cause they upgraded to that since.
    If they found something better than chlorine, then they can find something better than chloromine, probably.
     
  12. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    5,276
    recent studies indicate the formation of toxic byproducts in drinking water may be higher when utilities use chloramines. These studies also indicate that chloramine causes more dangerous byproducts than other treatment alternatives, such as ozone or chlorine dioxide.
     
  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Certainly.

    Still way better than bacteria.
     
  14. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Perhaps?
    However Chlorine/chloramine seem to be indiscriminate killers.
    Perhaps killing good bacteria along with the bad?

    "Kill them all, god will know his own."
     
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,202
    Bacteria in potable water is never good - at best, it's harmless.

    We produce all the bacteria we need internally; we have no use for consuming bacteria from water.
     
  16. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    5,276
    "We produce..."
    Do we?
    Or are we just good hosts for our billions of beneficial bacteria?
     
  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    "They are produced..."

    Better?
     
  18. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    passive voice
    common among doctors

    We do not produce them.
     
  19. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    There are sufficient definitions of produce such that at at least one applies.
     
  20. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    14,164
    Then we do not produce our own cells, because the cells themselves do that.
     
  21. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  22. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    1. China produces a lot of immigrants. Does that mean the geographical country of China literally bred the kids - as opposed to their parents?
    2. A cough produces a lot of phlegm. Does that mean the act of coughing literally breeds phlegm?
    3. The lawyer produced evidence to clear his client's name. Did the lawyer actually create the evidence?
    4. Rainforests produce much of the world's oxygen. Are jungles nucleosynthesizers now?

    'produce' does not have to mean 'literally, directly create'.
     
  23. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    5,276
    Curious language we have.
     
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