Can hydrogen peroxide be ionized?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by draqon, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    Trippy your going WAY over my head now

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    the most we had to do was identify what acids and bases out of a list produced which salts and wether those salts were acidic, basic or netrual

    draqon
    anything which can be netrualised can be ionised. As i said they become salts or electrolites (depending if they are in a solvent or not, though in bio-sciences rather than chem they are concidered to be the same thing). A salt is an ionic compound, there for any acid or base CAN be ionised
     
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  3. draqon Banned Banned

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    what I ask is once hydrogen peroxide is ionized (becoming salt) will the pressure inside change?
     
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  5. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Apparently you missed the part where your question was answered.

    Yes, it can be ionized.
    It exists, to a small degree partially ionized when it's sitting around doing nothing (that's what the meaning of pKa is).

    In theory, adding a strong base to it would increase the proportion of Hydrogen Peroxide that's ionized as HOO(-), but the trick will be to find a sufficiently strong base that's not going to react with it in a REDOX reaction.
     
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  7. draqon Banned Banned

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    Trippy thank you for answering my question of it being ionized...now as it is ionized, will the pressure change or not inside the chamber of confined volume?
     
  8. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    A Hydrogen Ion is small and positively charged, and the Oxygen atom in water has a couple of spare pairs of Electrons (and (essentially) a slight negative charge).

    If you think about it, a Hydrogen Ion is a bare naked proton.

    So, (essentially) what happens, is the Oxygen in the water 'shares' two of it's non-bonding electrons with the Hydrogen, and acquires a a positive charge.

    This form of bond is called a dative bond, but the distinction is essentially one of semantics, dative bonds are indistinguishable from ordinary covalent bonds.

    It's related to Hydrogen bonding, but it's stronger.

    Another example of this is the Flouride cation.

    When you dissolve Hydrogen Flouride in water, based on group trends, you expect the Hydrogen Flouride to be fully dissociated, and a strong acid. What we instead find is that it's actually a weak acid, and that's because the Flouride Ions are capable of clinging to the protons in water, and Hydronium in much the same way protons cling to water. This has the effect of masking some of the flouride, and hydrogen ions, ultimately reducing the value of the pKa.
     
  9. Asguard Kiss my dark side Valued Senior Member

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    Trippy this maybe a REALLY stupid question but is hydrogen a metal?

    Metals are on the left hand side of the periodic table and we deal with alot of them but our lecture though never once said wether hydrogen was one of them even though it freely loses electrons. If it is its still a strange element because it also forms covalent bonds which metals dont
     
  10. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    No idea, that depends on a bunch of stuff, such as temperature changes (many acid base reactions are exothermic, this is why you add sulfuric acid to water, not the other way around), and what you're actually trying to do with it.
     
  11. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Some metals do, for example, transition metals form dative bonds, which are indistinguishable from covalent bonds, there's a whole field of chemistry exclusively devoted to the study of the chemistry of bonds between metals and non metals - Organometallic Chemistry.

    Having said that, it's a spectrum between Ionic and Covalent bonds.

    Most periodic tables will place Hydrogen in the middle of the table, but in terms of chemistry, it fits into both Group 1 and Group 17 - it's also capable of gaining an electron to form metal hydrides.

    Equally, under appropriate temperature/pressure regimes, Hydrogen can take on metallic properties. It's called (funnily enough) Metallic Hydrogen and possesses all of the characteristics of a metal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  12. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    Would the following be true? Pure hydrogen peroxide spontaneously decomposes into water and monatomic oxygen. Then the monatomic oxygen combines exothermically to create diatomic oxygen, releasing energy, increasing temperatures, and forcing the hydrogen peroxide to release more monatomic oxygen. That's why pure hydrogen peroxide is explosive.
     
  13. draqon Banned Banned

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    yes metakron it is true, but you need a catalyst for that.
     
  14. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    A catalyst would work. So would impact, heat, and electricity. You actually get the same phenomenon in diluted H2O2 but the water absorbs the heat and limits the decomposition.
     
  15. Beans Yee-Haw Registered Senior Member

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    Would it not be a hydrogen bond?
     
  16. Idle Mind What the hell, man? Valued Senior Member

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    Would which bond be a hydrogen bond?
     
  17. Forceman May the force be with you Registered Senior Member

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    Boyle's Law


    Ionizing a substance would decrease the volume because of the stronger van der waals forces acting between the molecules, which would increase the net pressure of the liquid. An increase in the volume doesn't result to an increase in pressure: Boyle's Law!
     

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