Can everything be in focus in a movie?

Discussion in 'Computer Science & Culture' started by Syzygys, Mar 29, 2010.

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  1. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    Increased shutter speed wouldn't make items appear as if they were in slow motion, but rather yield a crisper image of fast moving objects. Yet again you fail to grasp the mechanics of the situation.

    And f-stop? You do understand that most camcorders have an automatic iris that limits the amount of light falling on a CCD, and so, you will get better depth of field in bright light?

    Because despite your alleged experience in the field, you appear pretty ignorant of how the equipment you supposedly used actually works.
     
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  3. Blindman Valued Senior Member

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    Shutter speed effects something CGI and film artists call motion blur. This can be a post effect or a render effect (very slow during render). Once again a very important component of photo realistic CGI.

    On another note shooting with a long lens with focus near infinity creates very wide depth of field. The camera must be a long distance from the subject but the whole scene can be keep in focus. EG a face and the moon behind it in focus from a single shoot.

    Francis Ford Coppola loved using long lens for this reason and others.

    There is also a technique mostly used in still photography to increase depth of field. Dont know what it is call but it involves shooting the scene at different focal planes and compositing them in a post process to produce a scene with two or more focal planes. Great for low light or cramped/small locations.

    In my view 3d movies should keep depth of field as wide/long as possible.
     
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  5. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    I said this earlier already. So the bottomline is that the director COULD make both characters be in focus if he wanted to. And he should, because most people's eyes are way better in focusing than the camera in the Sin City scene showed earlier. Thus the camera isn't realistic...I hate when out of focus people talk. Might as well be out of camera...
     
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  7. John99 Banned Banned

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    The camera's i used could increase and decrease the shutter speed. Not that i ever had any need to change the shutter speed. Most of my work was interviews, music videos, rock concerts, d.j's so playing with the shutter would have gotten me fired due to unusable footage.

    I never used a camcorder and if i relied on an auto iris i would have been fired due to overexposed images and i never used a camera with an auto iris anyway.:shrug:
     
  8. dsdsds Valued Senior Member

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    Pro photographers spend thousands on "fast" lenses to give sharply focused pictures with a good quality blurred background (called bokeh).

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    Setting a low f-stop value (ex. f/1.2) will make the aperture open wide to capture a lot of light. And in effect allows you to increase shutter speed so you can acheive sharp pictures in low light/high movement situatations.

    (John99, it seems you don't understand the basics of photography or the concept of EV - Exposure Value)
     
  9. John99 Banned Banned

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    Can you explain why?
     
  10. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    You clearly do not know what you are talking about John. If altering shutter speed makes footage useless, why have the option?


    You never used a camcorder? But you said:

    How else did you shoot video if not with a camcorder?

    Get your story straight John, and get back to us.
     
  11. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    You still aren't getting it. Only when all objects are at 'infinite' focus, can you acheive this. So you cannot do it for indoors scenes, and outdoors, at high zoom, there isn't much background visible, is there? Think before you answer that one, ....
     
  12. John99 Banned Banned

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    Well i will tell you to pm the BBC and ask them. If you were nice i would explain things to you. My camera had no 'shutter' either.

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    Why have the option? for one or two scenarios that never really came into play in the thousands of drum hours.

    Nope, never used a camcorder...well maybe a few times.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2010
  13. John99 Banned Banned

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    and i am not a liar. you quit calling me a liar.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2010
  14. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    No need to 'pm' the BBC, as I went to school with, and was a physics lab partner of one of the guys that manages their tecchies that maintain the equipment for their radio stations. He's also a keen photographer, and has worked on the TV side.

    You don't explain, because you don't understand. It's not about me being nice, but you not knowing what you are talking about.

    But it did have variable 'shutter speed' or in terms of a camcorder (the term for a camera that records onto tape, instead of film, and a point you not grasping makes you look foolish) the amount of time the CCD is exposed to each frame before it's data is read.

    OK, so you never filmed anything demanding, so never read the manual and learned how to use your equipment fully.

    Yes you did. You shot video, so you used a video camera, or 'camcorder'.
     
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