Bumble bees

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by whynot, Oct 23, 2011.

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  1. Enmos Staff Member

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    Yeah, ok..

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  3. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Well, technically so is coal power plant ash. But most people don't use that meaning of the word.
     
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  5. whynot Registered Senior Member

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    kid your link just backed up what i said. lol. actually i know more about links on pesticides than the internet. been on the news about it. pasterized just meaning not running wild. hope that helps.
     
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  7. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    Wrong.

    Also wrong.

    No it doesn't.
    Read scheherazade's post.

    Really? Because, so far, you appear to know nothing. And where would one find "links" on a subject if not on the internet? :shrug:
     
  8. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Good one - that cracked me up.

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  9. whynot Registered Senior Member

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    your taking things too literal on the 'links'. im not gonna argue on this. its obvious who the trolls are. and its you and those going after me.
     
  10. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    It's very hard to take seriously someone's claim of being a scientist who can't spell "pasteurize."
     
  11. whynot Registered Senior Member

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    Who said anything about being a scientist? :shrug:

    I talked about being a student getting on a news cast for a project study we were conducting using prey instead of pesticides. it did some good. but not as well as we planned.

    But we also ran into penny legay(sp) when doing the flower convention in seattle. schools fun. wish i could go back. community colleges are great to. loved going.
     
  12. madanthonywayne Morning in America Staff Member

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    One day my family and I were in the back yard when a bunch of bees came flying out of the ground and chased us into the house. This occurred without any provocation whatsoever. They just started swarming and attacking us and then followed us right into the house. I sent the wife and kids into the basement and turned off all the lights in the house except the kitchen light. The bees were all attracted to the light and I hit them with hair spray which knocked them out of the air so I could step on them.

    Another time a wasp attacked me for no reason whatsoever while I was standing in my driveway talking on my cell phone. The damned thing just decided to sting my on my hand. By the end of the day my hand had swollen to the size of a baseball mitt despite having been given a shot of steroids at Redimed. I ended up at the ER.

    Out for vengence (and concerned another sting might send me into anaphylactic shock) I sought out all the nests in my yard (there were several). Unfortunately, wasps must have been really bad that year because every place I went to was sold out of wasp killer. I ended up using brake cleaner on the advice of a guy at the hardware store. It worked quite well.
     
  13. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    To madanthonywayne: leopold is correct here (assuming he is speaking of honey bees, which the rest of his post makes clear he is.):

    "... Originally Posted by leopold
    bees do not usually sting when swarming.
    bees swarm when forming a new nesting area.

    i had a similar situation but with yellow jackets and a lawn mower.
    i ran over the nest (it was in the ground) with the mower.
    needless to say they stung the crap out of me.
    at least 12 times. ..."

    Bees are full of honey from the old hive when they swarm. They need it to live on while they make wax comb for the new hive.

    This is also why "smoking bees" greatly reduces your chance you will get stung even if taking their hive apart for some honey. To the bee, smoke means: Fire near by - the hive may burn, fill up with honey now as we may unexpectedly need to move and build a new hive.
     
  14. madanthonywayne Morning in America Staff Member

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  15. Enmos Staff Member

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    Some is that is false and the whole thing certainly is biased towards bees.

    -While most wasps are not as efficient at being pollinators they do pollinate. Some plants are even exclusively pollinated by a particular species of wasp.
    -Wasps do create "amazing structures".
    -Wasps do have a hive mind; they can be social insects just as much as bees (depending on species; there are solitary bees too). Some species can even carry out coordinated attacks on bees nests for example.
    -Most wasps won't "fuck with you" at all, ever. It's just a few species that can attack you 'unprovoked' and usually that's in fall when they can be agitated.

    Many wasps are carnivores or parasitic (on other insects) and are useful in controlling 'pests' such as flies, caterpillars, and many other insects that may destroy crops if left unchecked.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011
  16. whynot Registered Senior Member

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    Lol, maybe the smoking cig in my mouth made them think fire!!
     
  17. whynot Registered Senior Member

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    Wasps will also go on a collective attack against other kinds of wasps. I watched yellow jackets gang up on european wasp.

    i recently took pictures of a swarm of what i thought were the most docile of stinging insects. i even put my hand in their nest by accident and they just crawled all over it. thats when i noticed what i was putting my hand in. However, they turned out to be yellow jackets.

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    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
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