Buddhist concept of the mind

Discussion in 'Eastern Philosophy' started by Magical Realist, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    It's better than not farting.
     
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  3. Amar Nath Reu Be your own guru Registered Senior Member

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    Yes IMHO, an evolutionary resistance which makes it necessary for us to think of our environment (run if you see a lion). But there is an other reality where the lion does not exist.
     
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  5. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    The state of enlightenment. But as I understood a recent bio on Buddha, he came to the conclusion that a balanced approach of moderation and compassion in the real world would automatically help in understanding "suffering".

    There is a story which cites a raging elephant running through a village making all inhabitant scatter, while he sat completely still in the middle of the road and just before the elephant was upon him it stopped and calmed down and did not harm him in any way.

    Of all myths and rumors surrounding religions, this seemed plausible and IMO, was confirmed in this marvelous clip of "what a wonderful world" by Toots Thielemans and Kenny Werner. Do listen and marvel at these few examles of natural harmony.
     
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  7. Amar Nath Reu Be your own guru Registered Senior Member

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    That is sure a good way to live one's life but understanding, enlightenment is a bit more than that.
     
  8. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Is the search for that necessary and not a result of "desire"? Is the disciplined journey itself not sufficient? I always ask myself what I would do with true enlightenment. IMO, enlightenment does not lie in the future, when it may be too late, but in the present where it counts.
    Alexandra David Neal worte about enlightened hermits living a solitary life high in the mountains of tibet, but are useless to society in general, because the refuse to communicate (vow of silence).
    Perhaps enlightenment is the ability to act with enlightened wisdom at any moment..
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014
  9. Amar Nath Reu Be your own guru Registered Senior Member

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    IMHO, it is one's choice. I am a bit inquisitive about things. My father was not.
     
  10. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    c
    Perhaps he was in balance with his needs and wants.

    Ask yourself, is that something like what Buddha would have said?

    IMO, Buddha was an important philosopher and moral guide. From my viewpoint, that qualifies as an "enlightened human being".

    But our observational abilities are increasing so fast and we are learning so many exciting new things all the time, I am sure your inquiries will expand your understanding of our universe and your own existence.

    Personally I am fascinated with the fractal nature of the universe.


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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2014
  11. Amar Nath Reu Be your own guru Registered Senior Member

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    Fractals are beutiful, some are amazing. I once made a temple, it was with Sierpiński triangles with a formula I found on the internet. Now I cannot get back to it. You are right, he was in balance. My inquisitiveness gave me my balance.
     
  12. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    I am not sure if it has any significance, but I noticed that "Buddha in meditation" is almost an exact copy of the "Mandelbrot set".

    I find it revealing that the centers of the Mandelbrot set are dark, due to "trapped fractals", whereas the edges of the set radiate "free fractals" outward into infinity. I can find similar implications between Buddha's philosophy and the Mandelbrot set.
     

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