Body Temperature

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by John99, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. wlminex Banned Banned

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    . . . the process is called: HOMEOSTASIS
     
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  3. Hercules Rockefeller Beatings will continue until morale improves. Moderator

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    Our heat is primarily generated by the hydrolysis of ATP. ATP is produced by the electron transport chain from the oxidation of sugars. Homeostasis is the process of maintaining an internal temperature by ATP hydrolysis and numerous mechanisms of heat retention and loss.
     
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  5. wlminex Banned Banned

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    . . .and your point IS? . . . .
     
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  7. Hercules Rockefeller Beatings will continue until morale improves. Moderator

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    My point is to correct your incorrect answer.

    In post#5 John99 further refines his question in the OP:


    The regulation of internal temperature is achieved by homeostasis – not what he’s asking.

    The heat source is exothermic chemical reactions, viz. ATP hydrolysis.
     
  8. wlminex Banned Banned

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    . . . viz . . . I gotcha' point, John . . . browsed the posts quickly . . . . just a comment . . .don't visit this thread often . . .
     
  9. John99 Banned Banned

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    Has the answer been given?
     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Nothing "produces" temperature. If it's 100 degrees out, then it takes zero energy to maintain something at 100 degrees. Things do, however, produce heat, and we generate between about 80 and 1600 watts depending on our activity level.

    With enough insulation - yes.

    It doesn't. It generates heat, not temperature.
     
  11. John99 Banned Banned

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    Seriously. Bill, why compromise yourself? Are you saying there is no source of heat to keep an object at a steady 98 degrees?
     
  12. John99 Banned Banned

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    "Things do, however, produce heat"

    Yes...and what is it?
     
  13. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Cells use the monomers released from breaking down polymers to either construct new polymer molecules, or degrade the monomers further to simple waste products, releasing energy. Cellular wastes include lactic acid, acetic acid, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and urea. The creation of these wastes is usually an oxidation process involving a release of chemical free energy, some of which is lost as heat, but the rest of which is used to drive the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catabolism

    Phosphates are well-known high-energy molecules, meaning that comparatively high levels of energy are released when the phosphate groups are removed.
    [...]
    Release of phosphate from ATP is exothermic (a reaction that gives off heat)

    http://www.trueorigin.org/atp.asp
     
  14. Cifo Day destroys the night, Registered Senior Member

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    The body creates heat due to the exothermic reactions that occur in its cells, with food as the ultimate source of fuel for these reactions. Muscles produce some of this heat, which explains why people feel hot when they exert themselves, especially in warm weather, and it explains why they shiver when cold.

    A human outputs from approximately 70 Watts to 870 Watts, depending on the amount of physical activity undertaken. (source) The major means of heat regulation in humans involves the production and evaporation of sweat. Scientists refer to this type of reaction as "[URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_feedback]negative feedback[/url]", a reaction reduces and/or eliminates the phenomenon that causes the condition.
     
  15. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Correct. If it's 98 degrees out it takes no source of heat; the temperature will remain at 98 degrees no matter what. If it's 95 it takes a small amount of heat. If it's 20 it takes more. If its 110 degrees out you have to take heat OUT of the object.

    There is no one source of heat that will keep an object at a steady 98 degrees.
     
  16. John99 Banned Banned

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    Good responses. I really like the "exothermic reactions" theory and will look into it.

    Sadly, i cannot find any conclusive evidence.

    Note: I used this search prases - "exothermic reactions that occur in cells keeps body temp"

    "exothermic reactions warms body"

    I am just getting a hodge podge of answers here and nothing, that i consider, conclusive.

    Is there something in my search phrase?

    Bear in mind the question is NOT regarding thermoregulation which is fairly easy to figure out.

    Secondly, why am i being attacked (by certain members with free reign, no less) from the first post? I am asking a question...or am i missing something? Is this not what we do on a science forum? Even the "moderator" came in and took a shot. He is a fair moderator who is actually knowlegdable too.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  17. John99 Banned Banned

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    So does this "exothermic reaction" take place in each and every cell?
     
  18. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    I noticed that. Must have been something you said in another post. I thought your question was a good question and it would have gotten a different response had someone else started it. I haven't read a lot of your posts, but I have to say, did you piss a few people off or what?:shrug:
     
  19. John99 Banned Banned

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    I think it is partly human nature. They feel secure in that there will be no repercussions, from myself verbally, or the mods so they feel secure. Which is true in real life for me, i've never been in a phsical fight so it is not like someone calls me a nmae and i am going to hit them.

    It does not bother me as a person though. I always try to take into consideration that there is an actual person on the other end who may take unwarranted criticism seriously, which i really dont. If i were a child or teenager then it may be harmful in that i would say...omg, he\she called me stupid but then i really dont know because in HS the bullies didnt really bother me in that i realized that more often then not they had real problems in their lives...which does not make it right but sometimes these things happen without the bullly realizing that they are hurting another.

    Then there are those here who view posts\threads as an ulterior motive ie. paranoia, to some extent. To me it is disheartening because i only represent myself. Sometimes the individuality, not joining what would be considered the norm\mainstream makes peole prone to indulge in abusive behavior. Like i sida, though for myself, i dont feel particulalry abused. I dont like when peole bait me to get me banned though.

    I think peole have a tendency to read into things. In that sense i have not helped matters though. I have been here since the site was founded, though i used a different name then. Well i was younger and i have changed so more mellowed out over time. Therefore i changed my name.
     
  20. John99 Banned Banned

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    'course, i wouldnt want members who call me namse to feel bad either. Though i would not mind a mod slapping there hand from time to time.
     
  21. leopold Valued Senior Member

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    i'm speechless.
     
  22. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    John, let me take a shot at explaining the things you're asking about. In a effort to make it clear and direct, I'll skip over some of the deeper details - which aren't really needed to understand what you want to know.

    First off, all the living cells in your body need food to survive so yes, they are all using metabolism. (There's quite a number of dead cells - as in the outer layer of skin, hair, finger- and toenails that were produced by living cells, but once produced quickly die.)

    And it's entirely correct to think of metabolism as a "burning" process that produces heat. It's just a MUCH slower burning than we see in a flame. But the process is exactly the same; technically, it's called by the name "oxidation". And oxidation means just like it sounds - the combining of oxygen and a fuel. In what we normally think about as oxidation the fuel is something like wood or oil and happens rapidly and produces heat quickly. Metabolism is the exact same process except that the fuel is food and the process is VERY slow. It still produces heat, though, just at a much slower rate than what happens in burning/oxidizing that produces a flame.

    Does that help?
     
  23. John99 Banned Banned

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    The blood helps distribute the heat or does every cell give off heat?
     

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