Black Holes coming this way.

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Xmo1, Jun 23, 2018.

  1. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Stands to reason with millions of black holes in the galaxy that some of them would be approaching our position. Why I haven't been de-rezed during my lifetime is pretty amazing to me. What isn't super cold is super hot in the universe. Having environments that grow life is weird, and amazing. Somewhere sits a really good chemist. Journalism 101 - The Bait, and the Click. Not intentional. It's just part of my writing style. I frame questions.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2018
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Put it in perspective. There are hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy.

    It's not like black holes are free to wander among the stars like children in a crowded train station.

    There are a lot of stars a lot closer to us than BHs - wouldn't it make more sense to ask why we haven't been pulverized by a nearby star?
     
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  5. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    No, it doesn't stand to reason.
     
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  7. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    The closest known black hole is some 3000 ly away. It is ~9-13 times the mass of the Sun. Millions may sound like a lot, but spread out over the volume of the galaxy, they are pretty thinly spread out.
     
  8. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Youtube U. strikes again.
     
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  9. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    The take-away message here is: space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how mind-bogglingly big it is. You might think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's peanuts to space.

    (Apologies to Douglas Adams.)
     
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  10. gebobs Registered Member

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    Wazzat?
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Tron reference, ya young piker.

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  12. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Isn't the speed of the galaxy something like 1.3 Million mph, and all stars and galaxies are moving somewhere near this speed? Then there are billions of stars. Somehow that makes the great vastness of space seem a little smaller, and more dangerous.
     
  13. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Not when you consider that the closest star to Earth is over 4 light years away.
     
  14. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    If the galaxy as a whole has this velocity then all the stars in the galaxy share it and the relative speed between individual stars isn't that great. In the same way, the Sun orbits the center of the galaxy at ~200 km per sec, but so do the stars in our part of galaxy, so most nearby stars have much smaller radial velocities with respect to our Sun.
    And while there are billions of stars in the galaxy they are spread out over trillions of cubic light years of space. To give you an idea, imagine the whole solar system out to the orbit of Neptune shrunk down to the size of a standard marble. There are twelve stars, including the Sun, within 10 ly of the Earth. At this scale, ten light years equals 10, 500 km. So imagine a sphere 10,500 km in radius( 1.65 times the size of the Earth) with twelve marbles spaced out within it. Each with a relative velocity of .7 millimeters sec (0.0025 km/hr) to each other. What are the odds of any of them bumping into each other?
     
  15. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    So, bott0m line, it's not nearly as dangerous as driving in Moscow.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
  16. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    how fast do you think you can think about thinking ?

    like humans watch the tide come & go, flowers Bloom & die
    so does a star watch a species come & go.

    we are less than a blink of an eye in the time line of the universe.
     
  17. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    Super massive Black Holes sit in the centre of galaxys
    our Galaxy is due to collide with 2 other Galaxys in the future.

    i think Michelle Thallar has made a short video about Colliding Galaxys
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_Thaller

    Michelle is quite Fabulous
    you should get to know her work
     
  18. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    I think the real important question is: Who is looking for high speed things that should initiate a reaction? Astroids ok, but that is 16th century. We know about a much greater set of frequencies since them. I was paying attention to the Sun, and the first thought i had was to consider it a threat. There's too many what if's that are not proceeding to investment. We need not to be stupid. We need to plan and invest in possible eventualities arriving from space.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  19. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    The sun is a high-speed threat?
     
  20. Michael 345 Bali in Nov closer Valued Senior Member

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    Please don't keep us in suspense. List the top 10

    Are you not glad we are a flat Earth? As we post millions are gathering at the rim to literally run through our escape plan

    Everyone will run as fast as we can around the rim

    We can build up enough speed to spin us, like a frisbee, out of the way of any incoming threats

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  21. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Thanks Janus. Let me use this post to reply to others as well.

    Things in space do not need to bump into each other. Our whole solar system is directly affected by the Sun. The solar system bobs up and down in the galactic plane as it orbits the center mass. There are hot gaseous clouds in space. There is a greater density of particles in the arms of the Milky Way. There are X-rays and gamma rays way more dangerous.

    The gas giant just found is an example. It's not a black hole, but it's dangerous enough to do us some damage if it were closer. Close enough, and it could pull on the whole solar system. The important words are just found. It's good to know how vast space is, but that's kind of disingenuous when speaking about dangerous things.

    I watched the Sun daily for a few years. During that time I saw enough things to scare me into learning more about it. Basically, it's a fire so big that it's hard to comprehend. It's like thinking about the water under the surface of an ocean. It's hard to comprehend how massive and dangerous it is to life. It could burp in the right direction, and we would be gone - everything . the whole Earth and every living thing on it. It could happen right now. What I learned from reading science is that we could be 'terminated' in an instant at any time. More probable that it would take a few minutes longer, but its a sobering thought anyway. That's what I meant by de-rezed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
  22. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    we would not exist without it
    "what if" is not a scientific premise
    it is a philisophical question of the state of thought
    Fascination with the fragility of life and existance is normal.
    being stuck on that fascination so it becomes an obsession usualy makes a person incapable of interacting with society for very long.

    it sounds like your processing fight or flight ideas as you intellectualy develop.
    thats ok
    thats normal
    life is precious and special and intelligent life is rare.

    pondering your own existance is normal
    obsessing about your own risk of death and fragility of existance is difficult and you should talk to a profesional to help learn new things.
     
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  23. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    Launching to Observe Our Sun

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    Our newest mission to observe our Sun, the Parker Solar Probe, is slated to launch later this year.

    Image Credit: NASA

    Last Updated: June 22, 2018
    Editor: Yvette Smith
    Tags: Historic Missions, Image of the Day, Launches, NASA History, Sun

    https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/parker-solar-probe



    https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/launching-to-observe-our-sun

     

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