Biology and Genetics Links

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by S.A.M., Jun 6, 2007.

  1. Hercules Rockefeller Beatings will continue until morale improves. Moderator

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    ResearchGATE is the leading professional network for scientists. It's free of charge and designed to meet researchers' needs.

    http://www.researchgate.net/
     
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  3. eupyongri Registered Senior Member

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  5. biolife Registered Member

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    Hi,
    It’s a great initiative!
    I came across a web blog site, which is covering wide ranges of databases, connecting cancer and stem cells towards the emerging field of personalized cancer medicine. here is it: //stemcellresources.blogspot.com
    greets!
     
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  7. tomperrino Registered Member

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    Thanks sooooooooo much, this is a very good information , to the bookmarks definitly
     
  8. krash661 [MK6] transitioning scifi to reality Valued Senior Member

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    I might be wrong here because i did not go through all pages but IMO this thread needs
    the topic included,
    neuroscience, neurology and the human brain

    just a thought.
     
  9. Eagle9 Registered Senior Member

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    Good day

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    I need to find the detailed structure, the exact nucleotide sequence of any certain and real gene (but not very long please) belonging to any species written in this (or similar) manner:

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    That is, where this gene starts, how long is its structural gene, where it ends and etc. I tried to find this in the following web-sites but without any success:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
    http://asia.ensembl.org/index.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_notable_genes
    Can anybody help me?

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  10. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    I don´t know if this will do, but page 232 of this link has dozens of slight variation listed in the form you want, I think, but am way out of my field of knowledge.
    See: http://wssp.rutgers.edu/StudentScholars/WSSP08/WSSP-files/Lecture/Qui.pdf

    I knew that sugarcanes had been sequenced in Brazil, but no link related to that seemed to have the form you want. I did not even try to understand the link´s message, but think they may be following the evolution of a gene. Sort of like we now have monkeys, apes, humans etc. from one earlier common life form.
     
  11. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Homo sapiens is a species of ape. Besides the great apes (humans, chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans), the lesser apes (gibbons), the Old World monkeys and the New World monkeys, other primates include the tarsiers, lemurs and lorises.
     
  12. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks. I knew we are the "hairless ape" etc - just was trying to explain what I thought the link I gave was about, based on the page 232 figure (no text read) that had one line splitting into two, then they divided more. etc.

    Just out of courosity, if you know (I´m to lazy to search) is the "howler money" a true monkey?
     
  13. Eagle9 Registered Senior Member

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    Ok, thanks

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    By the way, I found the web-site that I needed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ for example for
    RPL11 gene I found this link with complete (as I hope) nucleotide sequence

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  14. elte Valued Senior Member

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  15. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    For those interested in evolution in general and in phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary relationships in particular, the University of California at Berkeley has some interesting material online:

    First, they have a broad outline of evolution in general at their 'Evolution 101' site. This material is maybe at an advanced secondary level, or perhaps the level of an introductory class for non-majors.

    http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/evo_toc_01

    Second, there's an easily understood undergraduate introductory level discussion of phylogenetic reconstruction of evolutionary relationships here. It introduces more of the technical vocabulary and the motivations for doing the kind of technical things that practicing phylogeneticists do.

    http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/phylogenetics_01

    And finally, here's the lecture notes for Berkeley's spring 2014 graduate class on phylogenetics. It probably won't be entirely comprehensible to most readers (that most definitely includes me), not least because the notes are notes, highly condensed and lacking the spoken lectures and the readings. But they do illustrate how the ideas that the previous website introduces are further elaborated when professional biologists start to make use of them in research.

    http://ib.berkeley.edu/courses/ib200/IB200_SyllabusHandouts.shtml
     
  16. Intersect Registered Member

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    thanks for the links
     
  17. Eagle9 Registered Senior Member

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    Good day!
    I need some detailed information about:
    1) Bacterial replication, 1-2 pages would be enough explaining how this happens.
    2) Bacterial resistance, more precisely the role of plasma membrane in resistance.
    Can you please advise me some text-book where these are explained in detail?

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