Best Running Tips

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by arindam, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

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    O.K. I will add to this for the man knows what he is saying . The kick is important too. Be aware of what your leg is doing behind you when your leg is lifted . Keep it straight behind you just like you do your toes hitting the ground in front of you . Yeah you do , you wing them out side to side . Keep them straight behind you. You will feel the difference when you do .
    There is much debate on whether your hands and arms are at your side or at your buttock as you swing your arms . I personally keep mine at my side , but that was the way I was taught . Some of the newer runners keep them down by there buttock and have had lots of success in winning races . The theory is you get more pendulum effect and can conserve energy better with them hanging lower. I think it is more personal choice my self. The main thing is to pace your self
     
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  3. spanglo Registered Senior Member

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    Very good tips, thanks all. A number of these tips have been a tremendous help, such as toes forward and heel to toe.

    I'm new to running having started this past Jan, so I'm still trying to fine tune my form. My right foot still ducks a bit, and I'm having some issues with my calf muscles when I push the pace or go for long distances. Initially I wasn't able to run more than 2 city blocks before my lungs caught fire and the legs got wobbly. Now I can comfortably run 4 miles at a slow pace, or 2.5 miles at a fast pace. My goal is to run the Carlsbad Marathon next Jan.
     
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  5. sikander Registered Member

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    If you run properly with proper foot-strike . Then you cant be harmed . As marathon runners run on road and they never had any knee problems during their life . There is always a bad way of doing a good thing .
     
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  7. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    True, and many novice runners hurt themselves with bad form or worn out shoes. Nothing hurts quite like plantar faciitus and it takes a long time to heal. Nothing makes you feel a gimp like a good solid limp for a few months.....Good shoes can address that. I use Aesics gel sole runners shoes, 3 pair alternating days, replace all 3 pairs every 5 months when the wear indicators on the soles show as too worn down. I retire them to around-the-house shoes then, until the top wears through, then I toss them.

    A lot of long distance runners hold their elbows up due to having gotten a good dose or two of 'runners road rash' on their underarms. Been there, done that, it hurts pretty bad for a while, looks like a sunburn near your arm pit.

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    Conservation of forward momentum becomes really important as you amp up your mileage. Even more so if you are racing, but then the pendulum swings of your arms are much shorter due to the speed involved, so you can hold your arms up much higher. That shortens the pendulum motion to match your foot placement.

    My son says that I look funny running due to these concerns, holding my arms out from my body proper, elbows up, hands down and swinging. I can feel the momentum as I bring my hands forward though, it kind-of pulls me ahead. The sharing around of the effort between my legs and my arms allows me to go further.

    I must admit that the daily morning run puts a very positive spin on my whole day, wakes me up and relaxes me, opens everything up and makes me feel very healthy.

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    Insures that my dog eats her kibble and gets a good nap as well....has also made her quite the muscle - hound.

    Oh yeah - and Me - Ki has it right, you must learn how to pace yourself to go the distance and the speed you desire.
     
  8. Believe Happy medium Valued Senior Member

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    1,194
    Oddly enough I find that running with shoes but without socks seems to help a lot. Socks (at least for me) tend to bunch up funny once you start to sweat. This can cause hot spots (sore areas) on the feet. The sore feet cause me to run a little funny which makes for aches and pains later in my back and feet.
     
  9. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    I had to go to running socks due to such problems with regular socks.

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    I pay very strict attention to the fit of my shoes as well. Also use 6 inch compression briefs to avoid inner thigh road rash when my thigh muscles get pumped after a few miles.

    A small injury you get one day can turn into a significant injury after a few days more effort unless you address the problem. This includes stuff like blisters, incipient plantar faciitus and athletes foot.
     
  10. Collen Registered Member

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    Hello arindam. Thanks for your wonderful tips. I will try to follow these tips during my running. i do running regularly and it is my favorite exercise so these tips are useful and important for me. Keep posting.
     
  11. Morgen Registered Member

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    Components of a safe, effective exercise program are Frequency, intensity, and time or duration. Do not accelerate your workout time too rapidly. If you are overweight and out of fitness, you will need to lose your weight for the perfect body shape and fitness.
     
  12. wannia Registered Member

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    Hi.........
    All tips so good.I also run flat footed,But now i avoid.
    Thanks allot for sharing these tips.
     
  13. smellincoffee Registered Member

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    For those who run regularly -- how often a week do you usually go out? Currently I walk seven days a week, and I'm thinking of transitioning to jogging. From what I've read, though, running seems a more intensive activity and the books advocate rest days between running days. Three days a week (each including an hour or so of running) seemed to be the norm in The Beginning Runner's Handbook.
     
  14. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, alternating running days with "off" days doing some other activity is recommended for recovery.

    Unfortunately, my 95 pound American Field Yellow Labrador does not subscribe to that theory so she and I run a minimum of 7 miles every day, 7 days a week rain, shine, ice or snow, from as high as 100 F and as low as -18 F. While my legs are always a bit sore I am just fine otherwise. We did get up to 10 miles a day for a while last spring but the summer heat convinced her to spend more time swimming, playing tug-o-war and fetch with sticks we find on the trails.

    I figure that at 61, if I can go out and do that every day, I should. I am healthy as a horse and appear 10 - 15 years younger than my actual age. I am on only 1 maintainence med for blood pressure. (Borderline hypertension) Most of the folks I know that are my age are on a half dozen meds now, but they do not exercise or eat right as I do.

    EDIT: I should stress that I do not run fast, my average speed is about 5 mph, though I can hit 12 mph if needed.
     
  15. Shogun Bleed White and Blue! Valued Senior Member

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    It depends on what you want to do, speed, cardio or agility?
     
  16. Lilalena Registered Senior Member

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    How about running backwards? I saw it featured on a health show some time ago. If you can find a safe place in which to run (being able to find such a place is the main problem) they say it is considerably less taxing on the knees and gives the same workout.

    I've tried it and it feels like getting a back massage WHILE exercising.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011
  17. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    When my dog stops to sniff I turn around and go backwards until she finishes and catches up with me. I read that going backwards is beneficial for the knees as well, which is the motivator for doing that. It also gives me a change of pace from just running forwards at a steady speed.

    My motivations are several. Firstly, my dog is a serious exercise-hound. When she was a 16 pound 10 week old puppy she started taking me out for 5 miles a day, every day. Having a puppy that did this was a new experience for me, I had never even heard of such a thing. Then I found that if I did not take her out for that long a distance she would eat holes in the walls and dig holes all over the yard. She stripped the bark off a cedar tree in the back yard after biting off all of the lower branches and turning them into mulch, killing the tree. She literally broke up a 4 foot long section of tree trunk into little pieces and carried the rocks from my wife's rock garden all over the yard. So she must get her daily miles and play time or else!

    Secondly, I am aging and do not wish to become handicapped or disabled, nor do I want to suffer from any of those other nasty things that we can get as we age. 50 miles a week is enough to curb the shortening of muscular telemeres on an ongoing basis. I have no atherosclerotic plaque in my blood vessels at all and my reaction time is very good, so running serves as my primary health care strategy.

    Thirdly, I am a martial artist and practice Taekwon Do daily. Running gives me a solid base platform for my martial arts practice, it helps keep my muscles strong, my reflexes fast, my balance solid and my perceptions clear.

    I could actually go on, but I won't. Suffice it to say that running has become a base part of my daily life now and it would seem very strange not to go out and run every day if I were to stop.
     
  18. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    I should note that this has introduced me to a bunch of other older folks who do the very same thing, except they don't have my dog to go with them. One fellow does 70 miles a week, but most run 50 - 60 miles a week. There are couples, groups and clubs of older persons on the trails every day. I am about to go out there and do my daily run now, will no doubt encounter several of these persons when I do so.

    I am pleased to find that so many older persons are staying extremely active as they age, it improves the quality of our lives substantially.

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  19. Lilalena Registered Senior Member

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    What would be the minimum number of miles per week to prevent muscular shrinkage?

    I didn't know it was preventable
     
  20. smellincoffee Registered Member

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    That is impressive! The reason I decided to switch to an active lifestyle is that my doctor put me on blood pressure medication -- and I needed it, because I had some serious spells back in July. Since then I've been losing weight, gaining in strength, and feeling much healthier, so I want to continue that commitment. Even so, walking seven miles at a brisk pace is my maximum -- I was doing eight, spread out throughout the day, but my knees began rebelling. Now I walk in the mornings and evenings and let my knees rest during the day. I've also started doing exercises to strengthen them in anticipation of running.
     
  21. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    Sounds wise to me. I spiked a couple of high readings (165/105) and my blood pressure average went up to 140/90. I have a cuff and was taking frequent readings, saw that number too often for my own comfort.

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    It takes about 50 miles a week to preserve telomere length. From Science Daily:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/search/...tion=all&filename=&period=365&sort=relevance#

    A bunch of recent articles that link telomere length to health, longevity and cancer among other things. Both diet and exercise can influence them significantly. Maintaining or lengthening telomeres appears to be an important health factor as we age.
     
  22. Ghost_007 Registered Senior Member

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    2,170
    Great tips buddy. Will watch my feet very closely next time.

    I think running is the hardest exercise, I'm finding it very tough. My technique at the moment is just not right, its very laboured. I have some new jogging trainers and I'm just going light for now, hope to build up gradually.
     
  23. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    Keep at it, concentrate on your style and form, keep it conservative and you will get there. It took me quite some time to get it right, now it is just part of every morning, like brushing my teeth after breakfast, though it takes a little more energy than that does.

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