Ash tree

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by timojin, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    Here in Chicago area Ash tree are going through attack to extinction .

    How are they going in your area ?
     
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  3. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Not so good the Emerald Ash Bored is a bitch.
     
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  5. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    we over planted creating vectors for the disease/pests.
    There are several varieties of ash trees . Not all seem prone to suffering. We had one tree die above ground, then regrow from the roots. We have dozens more that are still healthy.
     
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  7. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    I have about 20 or more death ash tree I would say the oldest perished about 10 years ago some perished around 4 years ago, It is interesting the bark of the tree becomes loose as is dying .
     
  8. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Many ash trees around me looked to be in trouble before the borer, which is just lately arriving in force (past couple of years) - but central Minnesota is near the northern and western boundary of most species' range.

    Some people have hypothesized that both very old and very young trees of most ashes are more resistant, the problem being that the middle aged are universally vulnerable (all species). So eventually, as with the similarly affliction-patterned chestnut, they will all be wiped out via failure to reproduce. At any rate, it's being handled like Dutch Elm disease - prompt removal of all infected trees, prophylactic removal of some neighboring trees, wood transport restrictions, scorched earth impeding of the borer's progress.

    All of this subject to the availability of money, of course. And cooperation, diligence - most people have no idea what kinds of trees grow in their yards, even.

    We still have some surviving American elms, scattered, and a couple of pockets of chestnuts more or less deliberately planted as refugee isolates. If ashes are reduced to that level, the landscape will be changed as dramatically as by the elm plague. And probably forgotten as soon.
     
  9. timojin Valued Senior Member

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  10. timojin Valued Senior Member

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    I hope you are right , I have noticed also that some dying closer to the roots are sprouting branches .
    I believe the boring insect is brought into the area is by the highways just like the Golden rods ( flowers )
     
  11. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    The killed American chestnuts of the eastern forests also sprouted branches from their stumps and bases, which were killed in their turn as they approached reproductive age - sometimes for decades, before finally dying.

    Informal observers have noted that some newly grown sapling American elms are reproducing much earlier and with fewer seeds than was standard for the species (and therefore delaying the height gain and crown story status that supports massive seed crops) - the species possibly becoming in essence a shrub, or splitting off a shrub form that beats the disease via rapid reproduction. That possibility was not an option for the massive seeds and vector-supported reproduction of the chestnut, but might be for various ashes.
     
  12. river

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    In Ontario , the Emerald Ash Borer , is distructive to say the least .

    I was wondering , could we use sound to destroy this insect?

    Why not ?
     
  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    The devil is in the details. Do you have any ideas about how sound could be employed to destroy Borers in a real-world environment?
     
  14. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Yes.

    I said yes.
     
  15. river

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    Origin

    How would you go about using sound to eradicate this insect ?

    There has to be a frquencey of sound that destroys this insect but does not destroy the tree and the vegetation around it .
     

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