Are You A Dog Or Cat Person?

Discussion in 'About the Members' started by mmatt9876, Apr 30, 2018.

  1. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    2,527
    I just got a heartbreaking request from my ex-wife's mother, who's 87.

    Her longtime friend died a month or so ago so Lu went to the rescue shelter and found a beautiful brindled American bulldog who has been in shelters for damned near her entire life.

    She asked me if I'd walk her and let her get some sun and air. She offered to pay me for it, and I almost broke down right then.

    That dog will be socialized before the first frost. She was terrified of my little guy, shivering and growling those deep ones that lead to an attack, y'know. She outweighs the legume (his name is Peanut, if I haven't said so already) by more than half, but she was a cage dog.

    I'll do my very best. I think it'll be a month before I can let her off her lead, but we'll see...

    [whine]Dammit, I'm old. All I want to do is listen to good music and cook good food. I don't need any more children.[/whine]
     
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  3. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    I'm really bummed out over this. Not for my old ass, but the job of taking on an unsocialized dog at her age is daunting.

    Wish me well, please.

    Yeah, I guess I'm a dog person now.
     
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  5. Truck Captain Stumpy Registered Senior Member

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    this isn't always the case. Sometimes, if you come up on them too quickly or surprise them they can strike without warning. Most people think of the Western Diamondback with regard to this type behaviour and it will typically warn and stand it's ground, but it's not always the case.

    then there is the type of snake itself. that is important.

    For instance, the Pygmy rattler (Sistrurus miliarius) is quiet and you may not hear it till you're right up on it - and you might not quite interpret that buzzing if you're unfamiliar with it (city folk do this alot - it's all about familiarity).
    The Timber Rattler ( Crotalus horridus ) is more mild unless you really tick it off.
    The Eastern Diamondback can be quite silent (and, quite frankly, a real d*ckhead), as herpetoligists note here
    here is a link to some good information : https://nationalsafetyinc.org/2012/04/30/safety-alert-spider-and-snake-awareness-tips/

    I would add a cold pack (chemically activated) to your emergency kit. it helps with swelling and some with the pain of a snake bite.

    .


    I definitely wish you well!
     
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  7. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    It's gonna be a tough row to hoe, but I'll do my best. Thank you.
     
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  8. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    Thanks! It is scary that the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake does not always rattle before it strikes. It makes sense that they will sometimes stay silent when you get too close to them to avoid detection and only rattle their tail when they need to warn you to get away.
     
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  9. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    I wish you well!
     
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  10. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    I think the younger rattlesnakes can sometimes have an undeveloped rattle until they grow up.
     

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