Arabian King Shahrayar Confused By Hidden Garden She-Hyrax?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by common_sense_seeker, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    One Thousand and One Nights is retold as the fables and stories in the Arabian Nights which has a documentary on BBC4. Middle eastern folklore still has powerful undertones of beliefs in modern society. I propose that just as european fables are timeless works of wisdom with as yet unknown truths of reality at their heart, so are the tales of 1001 Arabian Nights. The story of king Shahrayar who believes he has been deceived by a woman in his walled garden must have a basis in real events imo.

    Compare with "the boy who cried wolf" and "little red riding hood". Should the re-interpretation be "the sheep in wolf's clothing"?

    Anyone see what I'm getting at?
     
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  3. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Mankind may have been sharing a garden far longer than anyone had previously thought. Did we spend 1 million years above the clouds? Were south african mountain tops a tropical shangri-la? The ice age would have been wet and humid in the tropics with the only reprieve being the highlands. Aridity of the latitudes would have created desertification of earliest human civilisation as we moved towards the tidal-loss interglacial. e.g the Nubian kingdom of Cush 5000ya with the black pharaohs of Sudan.
     
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  5. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    Mebbe, but we have found human artifacts in coastal caves on the beaches of S Africa which strongly indicate that we - as a species - survived some hard times by chowing down on tidal seafoods there, cooking them on fires in those coastal caves for many centuries.

    I bet Scheherazade was a real looker though.

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  7. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    I remember that the S African cave in question was much higher than the beach. Fishing parties could have used the lowland caves as occassional stop-overs before returning to the fresher highlands.
    No comment
     
  8. Pinwheel Banned Banned

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    I might. Maybe after I smoke this. :m: :m:
     
  9. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    lol..
     
  10. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Oops, I should have said "tidal-gain interglacial", not that anyone would have noticed.

    The lowland cave of S. Africa would have been used during the fresher interglacial and then abandoned for greater altitude when the humidity of the ice age got unbearable. The ability of the human to sweat so much fits with a drier environment than one which has high humidity. It fits with the mountaintop hypothesis imo.
     
  11. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    lol
     
  12. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    It all makes sense now! The dry cold uplands would have prompted the discovery and control of fire. With fire meant control of the caves. Butchering skills would have led to furs being worn for extra warmth during the coldest times. Only when we had furs did man start to lose his upper body hair which would have been a hindrance when swimming and hunting in the cold upland fresh water lakes.

    It makes more sense to me than the 'savannah hypothesis' imo. How about you?
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  13. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Ice age equatorial warming could also have led to an overall increase in equatorial cloud cover, implying an increase in equatorial albedo. This combined with the high latitude ice albedo effect would have accelerated ice age conditions.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  14. Pinwheel Banned Banned

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    Not to me. And I'm on my eighth roll.
     
  15. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    eighth roll? keh?
     
  16. chimpkin C'mon, get happy! Registered Senior Member

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    *passes the oreo box*
     
  17. common_sense_seeker Bicho Voador & Bicho Sugador Valued Senior Member

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    Could this tidal-loss have caused mid-latitude fog banks due to the warm air meeting cold northern waters which initially increased albedo before the ice caps formed?(!) It would be an explanation for the last glacial maximum (LGM) being around 20kya, which is only around the last quarter of the ice age cycle. Anyone agree that this a relatively good hypothesis by any chance?
     

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