Any aliens out there?

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by John J. Bannan, Jun 27, 2007.

  1. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    Thx it didn't work but at least now I can call it a hang over
     
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  3. Klitwo Registered Member

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    I mixing one up for myself right now. Slurppppppppppp! WOW! Sure beats a Whiskey Sour.
     
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  5. DwayneD.L.Rabon Registered Senior Member

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    Well here is a little addition to the nature of alien life, it appears that the nematode has the highest population of lifeforms in the local group of 159 stars (Largest population of species in the local group).

    Here is a link to the behavior of the Nematode
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nematode




    DwayneD.L.Rabon
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2007
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  7. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    wiki doesn't really talk obouth their interstellar capabilities, altough I somewhat agree that a animal that can live on land fresh/salt water is somewhat of a good bet for alien life (even if most of them are parasites) but then again your proberly going to get parasits everywhere there are macroscopic species, and their "design" looks simple enough
     
  8. Star_Kindler Registered Member

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    The nematode phylum is currently limited to ONE planet. Earth. Although there may be SIMILAR creatures, it is not at all likely we'll ever find something capable of breeding with any of the many nematodes.
     
  9. Starthane Xyzth returns occasionally... Valued Senior Member

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    I would bet that there are plenty of Earthlike planets out there on which nematodes could happily survive and flourish, if introduced from Earth.. Though they might initially have a problem with native bacteria and viruses, nematodes breed rapidly enough for random immunity to emerge and become predominant.

    As you say, though, the genetic differences would make interbreeding with any similar native animals impossible - although the native "nematoids" might look exactly the same due to convergent evolution. An alien biosphere would very likely use different base pair chemicals in its DNA & RNA, making it permanently incompatible with DNA from Earth.
     
  10. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    That's only true in a philosophical point of view so in real life it proberly won't be true in most cases where we are talking abouth carbon life forms the base pair chemicals will proberly be the same or differ no more then DNA and RNA do. What proberly is going to be different is going to be their complete evolution what means that the basic simple lifeforms might be the same but the more complex you go the more differences you will get.
     
  11. Atom Registered Senior Member

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    Lets get it straight.

    By aliens we 'really' mean..people like us...or - god help them - aliens that are far more intelligent than us....we do NOT mean nemotodes, worms, bacteria or maggots.

    Once we make that clear we can move on..
     
  12. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Do we have any proof aliens are out there or are we going on faith? Just because we want to believe its true?
     
  13. halo07guy Registered Senior Member

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    Becuase it IS true. The Universe is infinite, which gives everything an infinite chance of happening. That includes the circumstances that created Earth. Also, the main thing were talking about here is carbon based life because were carbon based life. Were carbon based because that is the primary materiel on our planet. On another, it might be hydrogen, helium, oxygen, zinc, bronze, copper, aluminum, selenium, and other materiels that could make up the dominat life on a planet. Just becuase carbon is what were made of does not mean other intelligent life. For example, look at the jellyfish. It uses a complex system of neural networks and relays to carry electrical signals. Now if a planet was covered entirely with water, and certain things happened, then a jellyfish like species could happen. A brain forms, the tentacles become more flexible and are used to manipulate objects, and the use of tools begins. Life on other planets could very well happen in exotic and unfamilar forms.
     
  14. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    The Drake Equation, as far as mathematical equations go, is quite simple. It consists of a string of unknowns multiplied by each other - that's it, no integration, no differentiation, nothing more difficult that multiplication. This means that the equation is accessible to pretty much everyone. Here it is:
    N = R* fp ne f l fi fc L


    This equation was devised by Dr Frank Drake (now Professor Emeritus of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz) in 1960, in an attempt to estimate the number of extraterrestrial civilizations in our galaxy with which we might come in contact. The main purpose of the equation is to allow scientists to quantify the uncertainty of the factors which determine the number of such extraterrestrial civilizations
     
  15. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    that's it. The only proof is an equation and a big universe? But no actual alien proof.
     
  16. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Correct. Its not proof of aliens, its proof of the probability of aliens.

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  17. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    kinda like a weatherman who looks at atmospheric conditions says 'the probability of a severe storm is high today'. But that storm never ever appears. And he keeps saying it.
     
  18. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Hmm not quite, but kinda..
    Keep in mind the weatherman is more right then wrong. You only remember the instances where they were wrong because it pissed you off

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  19. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    Drake's Equation is only the half of the formule predicting the amount of old enough planets around stable stars in the habitable zone can proberly be somewhat calculated at least for this galaxy, their what 200 billion stars minimum in our milky way let's say that 1% are stable most are in the galaxtic centre and let's be pessimistic that leaves 2 billion stars that have planets and the habitable zone isn't that small let's say 1/4 have a planet in it that leaves 500 million planets, give it a 50% change that it's to small (less then mars) or to massive (gas giant). That leaves around 250 million possibilities
     
  20. Starthane Xyzth returns occasionally... Valued Senior Member

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    The problem with this reasoning is: all those other elements don't form myriad complex molecular structures in the way carbon does. The metals you mentioned will form either powdery oxides/chlorides/fluorides, or homogenous metallic-bonded lumps with delocalised electrons throughout. Helium is worst of all - it's an inert gas, almost never reacts with anything, existing as single unattached atoms. (Oh, and bronze isn't even an element - its an mixture of copper and tin, which doesn't occur naturally).

    Have you ever played SimEarth? Something similar can be evolved in that: a tool-wielding starfish (the program treats jellyfish and starfish as the same taxonomic group, rather inaccurately). I look forward to the evolutionary potential of Spore...

    That's an exceptionally conservative estimate. Over 90% of stars in this galaxy are smaller and hence, longer-lived than our Sun, giving ample time for attendant planets to form in long-term stable orbits. Even stars in binary and multiple systems could have planets, provided the partner star(s) are at a reasonable distance.
     
  21. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    there is offcourse always the change that more then 1 intiligent species would evolve on the same planet humans have been walking around since
    200 000 years all the real technological steps where taken in the last 5000 years if we sat around a other couple of hunderd thousand years there might have been significant more intiligent species
     
  22. Star_Kindler Registered Member

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    The presence of ONE black bean in an infinitely large can of chicken soup does not confirm the existence of OTHER black beans. Even in an infinite universe, sometimes there's only one of something.
     
  23. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Give an example..
     

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