American time bomb.

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by R1D2, May 30, 2012.

  1. Neverfly Banned Banned

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    Trippy, I've opened the link; your post is worded in such a way that I'm not sure if you're suggesting there is something we disagree on or not. I'm not aware of any disagreement.

    I am aware of the Magma Chamber- however, the topic on the O.P.'s premise is one of the Worst Case Scenerio (W.C.S.): a massive explosive eruption.
    While the content of the Magma Chamber beneath Yellowstones caldera is more than sufficient for an eruption (Even if the other conditions are not right for an eruption at this time), it is insufficient for the W.C.S. listed by the O.P.

    For the W.C.S., we must examine the Plume itself and its probability of influencing the massive eruption needed to fulfill Discovery Channel and other sources fearmongering of such an event.

    The journal you linked to, starting page 112, we can examine the history of the Yellowstone area and plume and positioning of the N.Amer. Plate in prehistoric times, moving forward to the present.. Moving along, crustal velocities, crustal composition and seismic velocities and interpretation.
    Follow that with density, strength and reclaiming of material by the crust (cooling) and we have a significant time interval for magma to cool and be reclaimed by the crust.

    Again- let me know if there's something we disagree on.

    I posted the Wikipedia image as a demonstration of how easily one can see the program, think the end of the world is coming, then go see an easily accessible image that appears to support that conclusion.

    It's why I also posted the University of Utah journal pdf early in the thread and two more journals in that post.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
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  3. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Apparently this is where we disagree. I was considering only scenarios involving the magma chamber, and not the plume, as the last few eruptions have (IIRC) been explosive, high silica eruptions (generally indicative of the involvement of local crustal melt), rather than the effusive basaltic eruptions characteristic of the plume involvement.
     
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  5. Neverfly Banned Banned

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    Actually, I'm not sure we disagree, then.
    The O.P. doesn't discuss what I was hearing and the Discovery Channel version- Which listed a Super volcano that would knock the western coast of the United states off into the sea- yadda yadda...

    You are referring to the prehistoric explosive eruptions that were bad, but nowhere near as bad as these sensationalized predictions that would require a lot more energy to be released than what we are seeing.

    So I think this is more a matter of which event each is describing- plus my own lack of knowledge on the subject.
     
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  7. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    My understanding and recollection is that the prehistoric VEI 8 eruptions originating from the yellowstone caldera were sourced from the Silicic melt in the magma chamber, not the mafic magma from plume.
     
  8. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Consider, for example, the extent of the Lava Creek Tuff.

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    And that's just the ash that was hot enough when it landed to form a welded Tuff as a recognizable coherent layer.

    Addendum:
    For the record, I'm fairly sure I'm more concerned about the Supervolcanoe in my backyard going nova (Taupo Volcano on Wiki) then I am Yellowstone.

    It produced the most violent eruption ever recorded in history.

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    That bnig hole in the middle of the island? Near the top of the image? That's a volcanoe
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
  9. R1D2 many leagues under the sea. Valued Senior Member

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    We'll any newer ideas today? How to deal with yellowstone? An those graphs are some good information. They have lead me to ask a question here. If lava melts rock how is this contained?
     
  10. Neverfly Banned Banned

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    There are no actual feasible ways of "dealing with it" other than to monitor it and sound the alarm to run like all get out if it shows major signs of upheaval.
    Other than that, You might as well ask a nest of ants how to deal with a lake they need moved.

    Your question is answered in the links in several posts above.
    A quick read- The composition of the strata comes into play, along with how much heat is actually hitting the "rock."

    The plume itself is actually covered by the N.Amer. Plate. But like a frying pan, the heat is rising through the plate and magma is working its way up through small fissures.
    The amount of magma working its way up through this 'plumbing' varies which gives 'cool down time' for the rock in the crust. This also means that as the magma cools, it fills in lava tubes with rock again.
     
  11. R1D2 many leagues under the sea. Valued Senior Member

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    Taupo.
    Taupo began erupting about 300,000 years ago, but the main eruptions that still affect the surrounding landscape are the Oruanui eruption, about 26,500 years ago, that is responsible for the shape of the modern caldera, and the Taupo Eruption, about 1,800 years ago. However, there have been many more eruptions, with about one every thousand years or so.
    I would say it hasn't built a lot of energy up. It will be scary but not horrific. I may be wrong though.
     
  12. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    I hope you don't mind a bit of net picking, but lava is melted rock and earth on the surface outside of the volcano. By definition, it is cooling down and not melting any new rock.
     
  13. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    I didn't say that you should be, just that I am

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  14. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    As Neverfly said, we have a good idea of what happens when volcanoes erupt, we have a good idea of the sequence of events that lead to an eruption of the Jellystone Caldera, so you have two practical options, given our current technological advancement.

    We monitor, and wait, as we are now.

    We evacuate North America.

    And as has been pointed out, evacuating North America isn't terribly practical for a number of reasons. As impractical as evacuating North America might be, it's still more practical than any of the geo-engineering solutions we have available to us.
     
  15. R1D2 many leagues under the sea. Valued Senior Member

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    :grumble:
    OH........ Magma then.

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    Thanks for all the tips. Keep them coming...
    :thankyou:
     
  16. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    cross section of the Taupo Volcanic Zone:

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    Note the differences between Taupo and Yellowstone.
     
  17. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Why yes, Taupo is in a subduction zone as opposed to a Yellowstone hot spot. But what are you suggesting about that difference? Also, do you know if any subduction zone volcano's are classed as supervolcano's? I don't see why not, but I'm not aware of any.
     
  18. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Taupo is classed as a Supervolcanoe. In fact, Taupo was one of six Supervolcanoes hilighted by Discovery channel.

    The primary difference is that the TVZ is connected directly to the mantle, where Yellowstone is not so much.

    In fact, the Taupo Hatepe eruption, and the Eruption of Tambora in 1815 are the only two supervolcanic eruptions to have occured in recorded history.

    Taupo also produced the most violent eruption in recorded history.

    Addendum:
    I don't know if I'll be able to find it again, I'll try and have a look, however...
    Once upon a time I came across a description of the 186CE eruption at Taupo, For something like a week the volcanoe had been spluttering away. The lake was confined to the western end of the caldera. The caldera floor collapsed, and some of the lake drained into the magma chamber, causing the eruption to escalate, which caused the lake floor to collapse further emptying the rest of the lake into the caldera, at which point the violence of the eruption escalated from 'almost unbelievable' to 'simply inconceivable'. I seem to recall that the general consensus is that something like 50 km[sup]3[/sup] of material was ejectected in less than three minutes (and yes, this was a small eruption, comparatively speaking).
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  19. R1D2 many leagues under the sea. Valued Senior Member

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    Ok when do they think it will erupt again?
     
  20. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    The only information I can find offhand is that Taupo produces "Quite big explosive eruptions every thousand years or so." The other information I can find is that between the Oranui eruption (26,500 years ago) and the Hatepe eruption (1800 years ago) there were 26 smaller eruptions that produced 'local' effects.
     
  21. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Some small eruption. I think our modern world would be greatly troubled if it happened tomorrow.
     
  22. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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  23. R1D2 many leagues under the sea. Valued Senior Member

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    If Taupo erupted we would have some major issues but I think we would go on. Unlike Yellowstone, I am more concerned about any large eruption after all the "research". An Mount St. Helens is one bad volcano. Look at the wildlife damage it did. For example.
     

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