Amber fossil "unicorn" fly

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by Vega, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. Vega Banned Banned

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  3. draqon Banned Banned

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    whats the scientific name of it?
     
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  5. Vega Banned Banned

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    Ask him he discovered it!!!

    Contact: George Poinar, Oregon State University <email removed>


    Mod note: I'm 100% sure he doesn't want to be contacted by draqon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2009
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  7. one_raven God is a Chinese Whisper Valued Senior Member

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    Heh.
     
  8. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Cascoplecia insolitis.
    It's in the article!
     
  9. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    The 'eyes' are just ocelli..
    Most insects have them.
     
  10. Challenger78 Valued Senior Member

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    I never could comprehend your insectophilla. Or Varda's Arachnophilla.
     
  11. Grim_Reaper I Am Death Destroyer of Worlds Registered Senior Member

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    That is one Ugly fly.
     
  12. draqon Banned Banned

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    I am the one who loves spiders, too.
     
  13. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    They are just awesome

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    The ocelli are the three 'dots' on the top of the head:

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    "Though an ocellus is able to form an image, it does so below the level of the rhabdom and, therefore, the image has no physiological significance. The modern view of their function is that they serve to detect the horizon (hence, being out of focus ensures that extraneous details do not impede this function) and are thus important in maintaining stability during level flight. However, in some insects, other functions seem possible. For example, ocelli respond to the same wavelengths as compound eyes but are much more sensitive than compound eyes; i.e., they are stimulated by very low light intensities. They may measure light intensity, and the information derived from them may be used to modify an insect's response to stimuli received by the compound eye. Painting ocelli may cause temporary reversal or inhibition of light-directed behavior, or reduce the rapidity with which an insect responds to light stimuli. Such observations suggest that ocelli act as "stimulators" of the nervous system, so that an insect detects and responds more rapidly to light entering the compound eyes. In addition, in some species ocelli appear essential for the maintainance of diurnal locomotor rhythms."
    From: "Entomology", by Cedric Gillott
     

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