Absolute Zero

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Orleander, Dec 29, 2007.

  1. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    And we normally don't say "degrees kelvin" or use the degree symbol. We just say "kelvins" or 273K.
     
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  3. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    please note that I don't really know anything abouth the subject

    But I wonderd if -1K would react similar like 1K so that it's spin would increase again (altough reversed) and would show share similar differences like matter Vs antimatter.
    If it's not imposible in theorie Then would this particle gain energy when it's radiating it?
     
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  5. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Well, if you read the thread, you'd know that temperature is a measure of the motion on molecules and atoms. And that "absolute zero" is where all motion stops. And therefore, speculating about what -1K (negative stop-ness???) means is meaningless.
     
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  7. Enmos Staff Member

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    Sorry to nag you... lol

    But 0 K is complete lack of energy right ?
    How can anything be energetic at 0 K then ? No matter how electrons move, can't keep that up at zero energy, right ?
     
  8. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    0K is yust as likly to achieve like c(lightspeed), you can get pretty close but you will never get there
     
  9. Enmos Staff Member

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    I know, it's the hypothetical point at which zero energy is achieved or something, right ?
     
  10. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Exactly.
     
  11. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    No. It's a complete lack of kinetic energy associated with the molecules of the cold stuff.

    Yes, they can. (just a reminder - 0K is theoretically impossible. 0.000001K is not)

    The kinetic energy we're talking about is only about the movement of those atoms and molecules. The quantum behavior of the electrons in "orbit" around the atom is unrealted to the temperature of the atom as a whole. The atoms still share valence electrons so are still bound together in a normal way.

    Think of it this way. You have a bunch of balls connected to each other with elastic in a Web-O-Balls[sup]TM[/sup]. The web is on a big vibrating table. As the table vibrates, the balls are flung about, stretching the elastic. As you reduce the vibrations, the balls slow down and are pulled closer together (they "cool"). When you turn the table off (absolute zero) the balls are still there, still connected, and still in a web.

    Yes?
     
  12. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    10,717
    Huh? No. It takes more and more energy to get closer to c. Matter can only asyptotically approach c.
     
  13. Enmos Staff Member

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    Yes, thanks for the example

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    So I guess it's safe to say that electron do not possess kinetic energy then ?
     
  14. Enmos Staff Member

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    Huh? How did light speed get involved ?
     
  15. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    10,717
    Post #46?
     
  16. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    You're welcome!

    When bound to an atom and in a ground state (not excited by outside sources), I would have to say, classically, no. I could be wrong, but I've never heard of bound electrons being described by anything other than their excitation states or potential energy.
     
  17. Enmos Staff Member

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    Yes of course.. but that was a mere comparison.. never mind though
     
  18. Enmos Staff Member

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    Thanks

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  19. maxzuk Registered Senior Member

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    How does absolute zero work on PLASMA (The 4th state of matter)?
     
  20. kaneda Actual Cynic Registered Senior Member

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    Liquid helium is fine below 1.K . Molecular motion is supposed to stop at 0.K but atomic motion continues, as in matter does not collapse and so cease to exist. This suggests that a "colder" temperature may be possible where all motion does cease.
     
  21. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Well, a plasma is a gas that has been heated to such temperatures that its atoms become ionized. i.e. some outer electrons become unbound and the "gas" is now electrically conducting. That's a plasma. So, as you cool the plasma, it will become a neutral gas again and then eventually a solid. So, it behaves just like anything else that you freeze. It just starts out one phase farther along than a neutral gas.
     
  22. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    yeah but it stil freezes at 0.95 K what is still verry cold... makes you wonder could their be a element or a molecule that doesn't become solid when it reaches 0K?
     
  23. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    10,717
    What is the definition of the word "Absolute"? And the word "Zero"?
     

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