Absolute Zero

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Orleander, Dec 29, 2007.

  1. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    I never knew there was a different zero than the zero on a scale. So more than -400+ degrees is absolute zero. Why??
     
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  3. Idle Mind What the hell, man? Valued Senior Member

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    Just like with mass, there are different units of measure. Absolute zero refers to 0 Kelvin, which is the point where all subatomic particles stop moving. It is equal to -273.15 degrees Celsius, and -459.67 degrees Fahrenheit.
     
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  5. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    So if I am dropped into liquid nitrogen and frozen, subatomic particles in my body are still moving?
     
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  7. Enmos Staff Member

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    Absolutely.
     
  8. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Note:

    The point where all atomic motion is stopped. True absolute zero can never be reached though due to quantum effects (we would know the atoms exact position and momentum and this is verboten).
     
  9. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Not sub atomic. But yes, your atoms and molecules are still moving plenty.
     
  10. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    and how does anyone know that?
     
  11. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    What?
     
  12. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Know that subatomic particles are still moving in my frozen solid body
     
  13. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Quit saying subatomic. It's atomic. Subatomic are the particles that make up atoms, among other things.

    Because you still have a temperature well above absolute zero when frozen in liquid nitrogen at ~ -196C. This is still "hot" compared to -273C.
     
  14. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    Hey, IdleMind said subatomic. Is he wrong?

    So a frozen person has never been sliced up and someone said "Yep, atomic particles are still moving"?

    my particles are the same as water or plant particles? All stopping at the same temp?
     
  15. Enmos Staff Member

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    Absolute zero is defined by the total lack of nett energy I think, which basically means that no movement can take place at that point.
    Actually heat is a form of energy possessed by atoms or molecules by virtue of the vibrational movement.
     
  16. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    so my completely frozen body and a rock give off heat?
     
  17. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Yes, he's wrong.

    Err... probably not...

    All molecules have a specific temperature at which they freeze. At room temperature, iron is frozen, while water is a liquid. At 0C, water will freeze.

    Temperature is nothing more than a measure of the amount of kinetic energy the molecules in a thing posess. Solids, liquids, gases, and plasmas all have a temperature.

    As you remove energy from a thing by lowering its temperature, you are slowing down the molecules. This is where absolute zero comes into play. How can anything move slower than dead stop? It can't. This is the temperature where all molecular motion is as stopped as it can be. Dead stop. Quantum issues can prevent you from getting to true absolute zero, but you can get asymptotically close.

    Questions?
     
  18. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    Absolutely.
     
  19. Enmos Staff Member

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    I have one.. if at 0 K no nett energy is present how can matter still exist ?
     
  20. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    No kinetic energy - energy of motion. Matter still has an energy equivalent of E = mc[sup]2[/sup] in it's rest frame.
     
  21. Enmos Staff Member

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    So electrons never stop, not even at 0 K ?
     
  22. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    what does asymptoblah mean?

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    Is there anywhere in the universe where its thought to be absolute zero?
     
  23. superluminal . Registered Senior Member

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    No. Not that they are moving anyway in the way you might think of it. Electrons in orbitals are more like standing waves of probability than moving particles.
     

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