A decrease in entropy .. and magnets and solvation

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by DRZion, Nov 26, 2009.

  1. DRZion Theoretical Experimentalist Valued Senior Member

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    I've decided to test my hypothesis over christmas break . I'm trying to find some kind of soluble magnetic compound. On my list are-

    - homemade ferrofluid (which is magnetic, but I'm not sure how well I will be able to place it in a suspension)

    - powdered magnetite

    - any suggestions?..

    Essentially I need some kind of magnetic salt which would dissolve in solution of water or ethanol or some other easy to obtain solvent.

    I'm thinking of using this recipe for my ferrofluid - http://chemistry.about.com/od/demonstrationsexperiments/ss/liquidmagnet_2.htm
    I'm going to play with the intermediate - magnetite to see whether or not it will make a suspension. If not, I will take the ferrofluid and add additional surfactant to see if it will work as a solvent without the solvated magnetite settling out.
     
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  3. DRZion Theoretical Experimentalist Valued Senior Member

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  5. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Moderator

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    Entropy is continuous in time but that's got nothing to do with the fact its left unchanged by a Lorentz transformation. And a given Lorentz transformation isn't dependent on a variable. A boost in the x direction by a given velocity v can be represented by a particular 4x4 matrix whose entries are particular values.

    The only way you talk about continuity is in terms of something's dependency on a smoothly varying parameter. Lorentz transforming from one frame to another doesn't involve varying the Lorentz transform.

    This is another example of you trying to throw in technical stuff which clearly you don't understand. With regards to the continuity of Lorentz transforms as a group I could go into discussing the structure of the Lorentz group itself but no doubt that would simply pander to your wish to talk about things you don't understand in the hopes of convincing others you do.
     
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  7. DRZion Theoretical Experimentalist Valued Senior Member

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    Entropy of a closed system can in fact spontaneously decrease, with the probability given by fluctuation theorem.
     

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