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Thread: What are the different types of physics?

  1. #1
    science man
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    What are the different types of physics?

    such as one type being theoretical physics. What are the others?

  2. #2
    Penguinaciously duckalicious. Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Try this.
    But it does leave out experimental physics - the guys who get their hands dirty with something other than pencil graphite.
    "Theoretical" and "experimental" are normally subsets of particle physics.
    Whoops, also not mentioned.

  3. #3
    science man
    Guest
    wow thanks.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    "Theoretical" and "experimental" are normally subsets of particle physics.
    Not really, most of all classical physics had their theoretical and experimental physics. True theoretical physics only began to be taught in universities at the turn of the last century however. Before then, an individual scientist was equally adept at the theoretical and experimental parts.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by science man View Post
    such as one type being theoretical physics. What are the others?
    There are many sets and subsets of physics and ways of breaking the discipline down. I will just give you 2 sets to begin with that encompass all of physics today -

    1. classical
    2. non-classical (relativity, quantum physics)

    Fundamentals of Nonclassical Physics

  6. #6
    science man
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by John Connellan View Post
    There are many sets and subsets of physics and ways of breaking the discipline down. I will just give you 2 sets to begin with that encompass all of physics today -

    1. classical
    2. non-classical (relativity, quantum physics)

    Fundamentals of Nonclassical Physics
    wtf is the link. I don't understand it.

  7. #7
    "classical" is just a historical classification. Sometimes relativity is included in classical physics depending on author's intent and preference. A quantum mechanics textbook, likewise, may use classical as synonymous with the non-relativistic limit.

    Another historical classification is experiments before and after 1960. About this time the need to quantify uncertainty achieved market share, and people started reporting error estimates on measurements.

  8. #8
    Penguinaciously duckalicious. Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Connellan View Post
    Not really, most of all classical physics had their theoretical and experimental physics.
    True, I was talking about the "division" as it is today.

    True theoretical physics only began to be taught in universities at the turn of the last century however. Before then, an individual scientist was equally adept at the theoretical and experimental parts.
    Yep, in the "old days" it was all part of the same thing.

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